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  5. "D'fhág sé mo pháiste ag an b…

"D'fhág mo pháiste ag an bpáirc."

Translation:He left my child at the park.

April 7, 2015

10 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/niamhwitch

Uh oh. Tá sé i dtrioblóid.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/EricaDakin

Why is 'in the park' not right?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Knocksedan

Because "in the park" is sa pháirc.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/KateGorvel

I am unsure if there is a difference between paiste and clann. Can someone enlighten me please?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Knocksedan

Clann is more "offspring" than "child". It can apply to multiple children of the same family, as well as extended family. Páiste just "child".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/timmytoy

Paiste is a patch. Páiste is a child. Clann would be a bunch of one's own children.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/OliverCasserley

"at the field" - disallowed. Isn't "pairc" a park or a field?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/19O492554

A páirc is usually only a field if it looks like a park - a field of grass can be called a páirc, but a field of potatoes or other crops is a gort, rather than a páirc.

See this discussion for references.

Note that there is a similar overlap between "park" and "field" in English when it comes to sports - we refer to Croke Park, for example, and many stadiums in England are called "Park" - St James' Park, Villa Park, Goodison Park, for example, but we refer to "the action on the field" ("pitch" is also used), and we say "a football field", not "a football park".

All in all, "park" is the most obvious correct translation for this exercise, even though "field" isn't entirely wrong, and you shouldn't assume a 100% equivalence between páirc and "field".

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