1. Forum
  2. >
  3. Topic: Spanish
  4. >
  5. "El abogado busca las palabra…

"El abogado busca las palabras."

Translation:The lawyer searches for words.

September 8, 2013

64 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ajcaras2013

Why not "The lawyer looks for the words."?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/geneven

There's a big difference between looking for words and looking for the words. In the first case you don't know what you're going to say next. In the second case you know what you want to say next but you don't know how to say it.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JLopez1856

Technically you don't "look" for words. (you can look up a word in a dictionary) Maybe if you're doing a word-search, but even then you're finding/trying to find words. In this case the lawyer was at a loss for words. He was searching for/trying to come up with the correct words to say, he wasn't physically looking for words. Hope that helps understand it better.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/EugeneTiffany

I was out looking for words yesterday and found several under toad stools in my back yard, and I turned them all over to my attorney for just in case he needed them for his next court case. No charge. Good words, too, though somewhat rumpled.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ignatznkrazy

The lawyer could look for certain words in the transcript of a key witness's testimony before the grand jury. That's how I took this sentence.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mano.eljr

that was also my answer, couldn't find any reasons for this to be wrong


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/clawedinvader

Not much comfort for you, but I entered that and it is accepted now :)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/brmccollum

And I just entered it and it was wrong.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Ranchers1

It works today. It was their correct answer 5-17-2014


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Phil46

"searches" but few lawyers have such problems being essentially wordsmiths! A very amusing sentence.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/HagueAndrew

Yes, but when they can't find them, they busk


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ken.goodwi

Just a thaught, you could see it as if you are looking for something you are searching. It seems DL wants to make us think. I have thrown common sense and todays english out the window 3 chapters ago. Or maybe it was when the birds were reading the paper? Not sure that helps any.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/sam.cassel

I think it was looking for the answer in Spanish. Not sure if you typed it that way or not.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/lunarefiore

I said that. It said it was correct. Maybe it changed.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PranamKalla

Um... you should report this, because I typed in the exact same thing, and I got it correct. You might have spelt something wrong


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/worstnightmare33

i said that and it worked...


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mitaine56

ajcaras- it was accepted


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/91a7mad

It is accepted - June 2016


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/sheepskull

why should las palabras be translated to simply "words" and not "the words?" doesn't las imply the word the? i have had trouble with this in the past too, and I am not sure I understand it.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jeff.suter

Ok. When I entered "The lawyer looks for the words" this computer program accepted that response as all right. I would also like to think that "The lawyer searches for the words" or even "The lawyer searches/looks for words" as all valid, accurate translations given the fact that there is no context other than the sentence itself given in this lesson module.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/sophie106

Why wouldn't the lawyer searches for the speeches be correct?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Melita2

Kmukku, buscar = search for, so when translating buscar, you need the preposition in English = searches for words.

Sophie, palabras = words; speeches = discursos. Also searches for words is an expression in English, but not usually used with lawyers :-)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/sophie106

But according to Duolingo, palabras can mean both words and speeches.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Andreaja69

'Palabra' means 'speech' when referring to the power of speech, not a speech 'discurso' made by someone.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mostar99

does anyone have a trick to remembering that abogado means lawyer?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mirrie1402

I remember it because it sounds somewhat like "advocate," maybe it works for you as well?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Roger_Burke

I call my Venezuelan father-in-law lawyer "the avocado" and my wife smacks me on the back of the head for being a wise guy. Picture that and it will stick in your memory.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/CatCampion

Here's a tip: Ride the metro in LA and see signs advertising Abogados every day. It was one of the first words I learned!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/tedsmoker

Lawyers think they are above god. Say it quickly. abovegod-o, abovgado, abogado.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Mattaccino

I might actualy remember this.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LeoGirard

He's an advocate. The verb "abogar" also exists, meaning to speak on behalf of or in favour of someone. It's a "two-fer"....learn one & you have two uses!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/emtamber911

I ALWAYS forget that one!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/happyhealt

Think of a lawyer eating an avocado (sounds almost like abogado)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/kmukku

How about "the lawyer search the words"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/amymarietruax

This would not be correct in English.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/u3r2nozy

A lot of the sentences on duo do not seem entirely correct in English!


[deactivated user]

    Sure it would! At least, with ¨searching¨instead of ¨searches¨. The laywer could be searching the words of the ruling to find a legal loophole or something.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/swingophelia

    You would need at least for the verb to match the subject, i.e. "searches"


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/xxooooox2

    Wouldn't it be "busca por"?


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/rspreng

    Buscar = to look for, to search. No preposition follows


    [deactivated user]

      How would you indicate in Spanish what area/thing is being searched to find what you are looking for?


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Royraju

      No, "to search for something" = "buscar algo".


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LeoGirard

      Buscar usually embodies the concept of "look for". In less careful Spanish (maybe Eng. influenced in Mexico where "sándwiches" are now "lonches" and silenciadores" are "mofles") you might hear buscar por.


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/lonephoenix08

      wouldnt finds the words be right?


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Andreaja69

      encontrar = to find


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/timmyshanti

      Attorney, lawyer, barrister, advocate... makes sense differentiating between them on a everyday language site


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/vennelakolla

      why is "el abogado busca a las palabras" wrong? Can someone please explain


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Royraju

      Because we say "Buscar a alguien", but "buscar algo".

      For example, "el abogado busca a su cliente".


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JulianJohannesen

      So, just to clarify, if you're searching for a thing, don't use the preposition, but if you're searching for a person, use it?


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/bdawsn

      I just don't see the word "for" in this sentence. I see "las" = "the" instead. It makes sense to me that a lawyer could search through a contract, searching the words. Maybe even using a seach feature of a word processor.


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Andreaja69

      'Buscar' is to look for, or search for.... The 'for' is included in the word 'buscar'.


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Arsha123

      Hope this isn't my lawyer!


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/whiteNine

      siempre busco las palabras en espanol, pero nunca encontro :(


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LeoGirard

      ...pero nunca las encuentro. (encontrar is a stem changing verb something like "poder". "o" becomes "ue" when tonically accented.


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/whiteNine

      Thanks for the reminder


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/samoconnor

      why is this wrong! the lawyer looks at the words


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LeoGirard

      buscar=to look FOR, to seek, to try to find. To describe a lawyer looking AT words I wonder if DL would accept: considerar, revisar,examinar, tener en cuenta, pensar?


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Padoryn

      I said " The lawyer finds the words" It got marked wrong. Not sure how "seeks" and "finds" are different.


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LeoGirard

      You can probably find out be seeking in the dictionary.


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Jadeamous

      Someone i know had a nanny that only spoke Spanish to her as a toddler, but since she was so young she never knew when she was speaking Spanish or English, so in her childish lisp she would ask for an avocado. Her mum understood, but really it sounded like "quiero abogado" and her nanny couldn't stop laughing at the 3 year old requesting a lawyer

      Learn Spanish in just 5 minutes a day. For free.