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  5. "Öğrencilere iyi bir öğretmen…

"Öğrencilere iyi bir öğretmen gerekiyor."

Translation:The students need a good teacher.

April 8, 2015

33 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AlsEenPoffertje

Why is the dative case used with "öğrenciler"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/orde90

Gerekmek means to be needed. We usually use dative case for the preposition 'for'. You can also say Öğrenciler için iyi bir öğretmen gerekiyor.

Lit. A good teacher is needed for the students.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DottyEyes

So does this mean we seldom conjugate gerekmek? Like if I wanted to say "I need a good teacher," would it be "Bana iyi bir öğretmen gerekiyor"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AlexinNotTurkey

Exactly. It is mostly used in the 3rd person form. You might see a plural suffix (which is optional under most conditions) on the end sometimes if the subject is plural :)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/cvictoria42

Could it be used in the 1st or 2nd person in a context like "I need you"? Would that be bana gerekiyorsun?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DottyEyes

You da man, AlexinNotTurkey! Teşekkür ederim!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ImanDalain

In your example should it be ''gerekiyorum'' because of ''I need'' ?!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/pluckingstrings

No, because "gerekiyor" doesn't quite work like "need" in English. It's better translated as something like "is needed for..." notice that, in the example, "bana" is used, not "ben." So it actually literally means "a good teacher is needed for me," and NOT "I need a good teacher." Hopefully that makes sense


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AlsEenPoffertje

Ah, bu mantıklı. Teşekkürler! :D


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/90du5

What is mantıklı pls? Its like "mantik" in Arabic, which means logic. But I did not get the meaning


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/pluckingstrings

It's mantık in the instrumental case, so mantıklı=logical, makes sense, etc.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AlexinNotTurkey

It actually isn't in the instrumental case, but rather with a derivative suffix -li. This gives the meaning of "containing/with." The instrumental is -yla and gives the meaning of "accompanying/with" :)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/dieprinzessin

French has the same structure: Il faut un bon professeur aux élèves.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Complex77

Not quite. The öğretmen is the subject of the Turkish sentence, whilst the professeur is an object in the French one.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Ly_Mar

It looks like Italian is closer in syntax: ‘agli studenti serve un buon professore’ (literally ‘a good teacher serves the students (well)’ or ‘a good teacher is of service to the students’).


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/edubongo

can "lazım" be used in this case too?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Selcen_Ozturk

yes, lazım and gerekiyor are interchangeable


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/airelibre

Does lazım still need the dative like gerekiyor?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/airelibre

teşekkürler!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MustavaM

So is there is any deference between "gerekmek" and "ihtiyacı olmak" ?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AnneShirle825043

Why is gerekiyor not gereğiyor, because it is between an e and a i?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/saomi18

Gerek+i+yor i buffer letter -yor is suffix if word finished p ç t k letters and suffix start a vowel letter then p--b, ç--c, t--d, k--g or ğ


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ilknr1

Why is "It is necessary a good teacher for the students" wrong? Isn't it a natural sentence in English?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/airelibre

It's not natural in English, sorry.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AGreatUserName

If you say "It is necessary", you already have a subject: "it" ... so you can't just throw "a good teacher" into the sentence. If you want "a good teacher" to be the subject of the sentence, you have to remove "it" and place "a good teacher" there as you did in your other comment.

We do sometimes have "it" as a placeholder for an infinitive phrase with "to" (1) or a clause with "that" (2)

(1) It is necessary to dance. (= Dancing is necessary.) (2) It is necessary that the students have a good teacher. (= That the students have a good teacher is necessary. ... this sentence is correct but very, very unnatural.)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/pluckingstrings

I think the closest thing to that that is natural is something like "It is necessary that the students have a good teacher."


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ilknr1

What about "A good teacher is necessary for the students."?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AlexinNotTurkey

That works kind of. We don't really say things like "is necessary for" in English too often. It isn't wrong, but just a little weird :)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/rolandcassar

You could say "A good teacher is needed for the students", but it has a strange sound to it, like something out of an old fairy tale.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/tracymirko

In English, the subject must come first. To make sense, you must say, "A good teacher is necessary for the students."


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/shirdagh

The student needs to a good teacher


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MrHilmiNevzat

"Öğrencilere iyi bir öğretmen gerekiyor." Translation: The students need a good teacher.

&

A good teacher is needed for the students.

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