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"Él lo había producido."

Translation:He had produced it.

5 years ago

63 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/jennesy
jennesy
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Sounds like "el no habia producido" to me! grr!

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/FattigJente
FattigJente
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That's what she says in the recording. There's no way that's an L!

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/OjosDelMundo

Same. >.<

4 years ago

[deactivated user]

    Me too.

    EditDelete4 years ago

    https://www.duolingo.com/RMelSim

    Yep, me too

    4 years ago

    https://www.duolingo.com/Patmitarn

    Include me

    2 years ago

    https://www.duolingo.com/DuoMonster
    DuoMonster
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    Why not "he had it produced"?

    3 years ago

    https://www.duolingo.com/simoncrequer
    simoncrequer
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    That makes it sound like he had someone else produce it for him. But with "he had produced it," it's saying that he produced himself.

    3 years ago

    https://www.duolingo.com/SusanHill0

    Right.....so how are we to tell which one this sentence is? "He had it produced " as opposed to "He produced it" . Can a native speaker clear this up for me?

    3 years ago

    https://www.duolingo.com/hughcparker
    hughcparker
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    I'm not a native speaker, but I can clear this up for you. It's always "he produced it". Object pronouns just work like this in Spanish. It's very different from English, so it's hard to get used to. My solution to this problem was to refresh the object pronouns lesson a few times every day for ages.

    3 years ago

    https://www.duolingo.com/elissaf1
    elissaf1
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    The haber and the past participle can not be separated in Spanish. So you would need a completely different grammatical structure to say 'he had it produced'. In fact, most likely a Spanish speaker would not think the exact sentence you're specifying because their grammar doesn't provide it. Your sentence means: in the past, yet at a non-specified time, he was the agent in getting an unspecified agent to produce 'it'. This could perhaps be formed by something like: 'lo hizo producir'....

    2 years ago

    https://www.duolingo.com/Lupinibeans

    I wrote: He had grown it. It is one of the definitions suggested, but it was rejected. Can someone explain, please.

    4 years ago

    https://www.duolingo.com/jindr004
    jindr004
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    This is "to produce" in the sense of a farm producing grains, or vegetables or a tree producing fruit or leaves.

    3 years ago

    https://www.duolingo.com/rogercchristie
    rogercchristie
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    Me too. It hasn't been fixed 12 months later. Reported again.

    3 years ago

    https://www.duolingo.com/Talca
    Talca
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    He had made it. Also accepted.

    4 years ago

    https://www.duolingo.com/rogercchristie
    rogercchristie
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    It is now June 2017. Recently DL's software crashed and the fix appears to have been to restore a much earlier version. Sadly this has also restored many errors that had been fixed long ago.

    So today "He had made it" was refused in favour of "He had produced it". I have seen many similar basic errors over the last few weeks. It seems much of our work correcting DL's errors over the last three years has been reversed and presumably lost. Is it going to take another three years to get back where we were?

    But hang on. Maybe this is DL policy now - to go back to the beginning and start again (except this time with advertisements), and provide nothing beyond beginners and novices! If so, then there's no longer anything here for me. I guess it is time to move on.

    1 year ago

    https://www.duolingo.com/Talca
    Talca
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    Roger, after 871 days, you may need a vacation.

    1 year ago

    https://www.duolingo.com/rogercchristie
    rogercchristie
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    You were here when I started. Anyway, picking up a lesson a day on vacation was no hassle, Talca. I was really just getting into my stride and patiently waiting for the Immersion exercises to be made workable when it all started falling apart. It was such a great idea. It is so sad that the team chickened out at the last stage.

    1 year ago

    https://www.duolingo.com/rogercchristie
    rogercchristie
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    Incidentally, where would I move on to?

    Well I don't have many opportunities to practise my spoken Spanish, but I do try to listen to Spanish and French radio regularly - although usually they speak too fast, so I need to collect more recordings so I can slow down and repeat some of it!

    Also, I already have a few familiar stories (in book form) in English, Spanish, and French, so I aim to extend my library and read more (with just the help of a dictionary). And I should probably include Italian and German where I can as well.
    And I should start collecting electronic texts too (maybe articles from international newspapers in several languages). That way I could paste extracts into a translator. So far this has never been ideal, but it can be a good starting point. (My own personal version of immersion I guess, although hopefully it won't suddenly disappear without warning!)

    And I won't be leaving Duolingo altogether just yet. I have still only completed 60% of the Italian and 30% of the German exercises here, so I'll continue with these (to the bitter end or as long as DL holds together!)

    1 year ago

    https://www.duolingo.com/fezha
    fezha
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    I put down "He had it made" and it was wrong.

    1 year ago

    https://www.duolingo.com/Talca
    Talca
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    He had it made. and He had made it. have two different meanings. One means another person made "it." One means "He," the subject, made "it" himself. Let us say we are speaking about a fancy, chocolate birthday cake. He had it made. = He went to the bakery, ordered it, and picked it up the next day, for example. He had made it. = He baked it himself. (The cake was on the table. The guests were coming at nine o'clock. He had made it the day before, and it was perfect.)

    1 year ago

    https://www.duolingo.com/fezha
    fezha
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    Great answer. I'm a native speaker, but I've been speaking so casually for years that I've mixed up my own spanish. But you're 100% right!

    1 year ago

    https://www.duolingo.com/rogercchristie
    rogercchristie
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    That's a good explanation of the English, Talca, but how do we say "He had it made" in Spanish?

    1 year ago

    https://www.duolingo.com/Royraju

    Sorry, I can't write after your last comment. I was answering your question about saying "He had it made" in Spanish.

    "Él lo había hecho" is "He had done/made it", but it never means "He had it made".

    And no, "They had done it" is "Ellos lo habían hecho", "He had done it" is "Él lo había hecho", and "He had it made" is "Se lo habían hecho". Strange, but true. We don't use that construction in Spanish and we frequently use the plural in that case.

    Did you make the cake? No, I had it made = ¿Hiciste tú la tarta? No, me la han hecho/No, la he comprado hecha/No, encargué/pedí que me la hicieran.

    1 year ago

    https://www.duolingo.com/rogercchristie
    rogercchristie
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    So I guess Spanish is similar to English in that "Se lo habían hecho" is equivalent to "They [unspecified people which, in this case, we can assume to be the local bakers] had made it for him", yes?.
    But can't I say "Se lo hizo hacer" for "He had it made"?
    [Note Royraju's suggestion of "Hizo que se lo hicieran"]

    [To be honest, I think I'm well outside my comfort zone here!]

    1 year ago

    https://www.duolingo.com/Talca
    Talca
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    Él lo había hecho.? According to Google Translate, they used the same sentence as the DL sentence here. Perhaps Spanish has only one way of expressing it, and they depend on context?

    1 year ago

    https://www.duolingo.com/rogercchristie
    rogercchristie
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    Thanks. That's much more concise than my version. I got to "Él consiguió que alguien la produjera"  then gave up.

    1 year ago

    https://www.duolingo.com/Royraju

    Puedes decir "Se lo habían hecho".

    Él no tenía tiempo para hacer el pastel, así que fue a la pastelería...

    ... y encargó/pidió que se lo hicieran.

    ... y se lo hicieron.

    ... y lo compró hecho. :)

    1 year ago

    https://www.duolingo.com/rogercchristie
    rogercchristie
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    "Se lo habían hecho" is "they had done it". We were working on "He had done it".

    1 year ago

    https://www.duolingo.com/Royraju

    Yes, "They had made it for him".

    "Se lo hizo hacer" or "Lo hizo hacer para él", but it sounds a little strange, maybe because of the two "hacer" together. Maybe a little better, "Hizo que se lo hicieran".

    1 year ago

    https://www.duolingo.com/rogercchristie
    rogercchristie
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    Thanks Royraju. I have slightly altered my comment in light of what you say.

    I feel I'm on the cusp of interpreting the Spanish into an appropriate thought rather than into English. This stage could last several years! However, after three years, if my understanding is that of a four-year-old Spaniard then I reckon I'm doing OK so far. :-)

    1 year ago

    https://www.duolingo.com/lhg_boyd

    Why give a definition of grown if you won't accept it as an answer?

    3 years ago

    https://www.duolingo.com/Anita742500

    Why not "He had grown it"? Since grown it was the first translation they gave?

    3 years ago

    https://www.duolingo.com/LenFriedman

    I argued with the same logic. I think this is simply one of those situations where we need to accept DL's limitations and be happy we're getting so much out of this program. It's frustrating for sure, but I'm not perfect, either.

    3 years ago

    https://www.duolingo.com/hughcparker
    hughcparker
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    I don't think this is a limitation of Duolingo. "Producido" means "produced", as it sounds. If we were talking about vegetables then it could mean "grown", but the most general translation of this phrase is "He had produced it".

    3 years ago

    https://www.duolingo.com/mawill14

    Exactly! He had grown it makes more sense in English anyway- if you were talked about a vegetable at least.

    2 years ago

    https://www.duolingo.com/ace148622
    ace148622
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    I keep writing he had it produced

    2 years ago

    https://www.duolingo.com/Talca
    Talca
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    Passive voice?

    1 year ago

    https://www.duolingo.com/KUrL4

    How would you say... he had it produced.

    1 year ago

    https://www.duolingo.com/57flora

    How would one say he had it produced?

    1 year ago

    https://www.duolingo.com/OMichaelMageo

    He had produced him :O Frankenstein

    1 year ago

    https://www.duolingo.com/killerman64
    killerman64
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    he had it produced. why am I wrong?

    1 year ago

    https://www.duolingo.com/Andreaja69
    Andreaja69
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    'He had it produced' and 'he produced it' do not mean the same thing. The first sentence means that he found someone to produce it for him; he did not produce it himself. The second sentence means he produced it himself.

    11 months ago

    https://www.duolingo.com/FramingNoise

    Could this phrase also work in the sense of showing something? like "he produced the documents" or "he produced the item in question from his pocket"?

    3 years ago

    https://www.duolingo.com/elissaf1
    elissaf1
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    All of producir's dictionary definitions contain something being caused to happen, so I'd think not. I think sacar or presentar would be used.

    2 years ago

    https://www.duolingo.com/cogbon
    cogbon
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    He had it produced...not accepted o.O

    3 years ago

    https://www.duolingo.com/feliz78
    feliz78
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    Stop the clutter! Please do not report mistakes here and read the comments below before posting. HAHAHAHA OBEY TO THE COMMANDER

    2 years ago

    https://www.duolingo.com/dremwr
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    He had it produced should be correct too right? Duolingo said it was wrong.

    2 years ago

    https://www.duolingo.com/Andreaja69
    Andreaja69
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    'He had it produced' and 'he produced it' do not mean the same thing. The first sentence means that he found someone to produce it for him; he did not produce it himself. The second sentence means he produced it himself.

    11 months ago

    https://www.duolingo.com/TArdy44
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    Could this also refer to "producing" a film? If not, does anyone know the proper word for that "produce" ?

    2 years ago

    https://www.duolingo.com/rogercchristie
    rogercchristie
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    Yes. You will find it in the dictionary at http://www.wordreference.com/es/translation.asp?tranword=produce.

    2 years ago

    https://www.duolingo.com/PatrickFre487998

    It wouldn't recognize lo

    2 years ago

    https://www.duolingo.com/DonFoote

    He had it produced was marjed wrong, it means the same as he produced it!

    1 year ago

    https://www.duolingo.com/Scott31461
    Scott31461
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    Él lo había producido. (He had produced it.) Does anyone else feel that when you are writing this sentence in Spanish it seems like you are writing "He it had produced." and when reading it your eyes need to go from el to habia to producido and then back to lo? I know people say don't try to translate the sentences word for word, but it would be so much easier if they read left to right so, for example, a word that is written second (lo) isn't said the fourth word when translated.

    11 months ago

    https://www.duolingo.com/Andreaja69
    Andreaja69
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    That's an interesting concept! We could indeed ignore the way we speak our own language, translate literally and hope everyone understands. Try that with German! You just have to accept that in this kind of sentence the pronoun always comes immediately before the verb, and just slot it into its correct place in English when you translate it. After all, Spanish speakers have to do the reverse when translating from English to Spanish.

    11 months ago

    https://www.duolingo.com/MapledCanada
    MapledCanada
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    Why is it 'He had produced it' and not 'He had it produced'? Just confused and curious! :D

    10 months ago

    https://www.duolingo.com/Andreaja69
    Andreaja69
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    'Había producido' is the pluperfect tense and means 'had produced', with the pronoun 'it' to follow. To 'have something done', as in 'he had it produced' would use a different construction, of which there are several.

    10 months ago

    https://www.duolingo.com/MapledCanada
    MapledCanada
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    Why is it 'He had produced it' instead of 'He had it produced'?

    9 months ago

    https://www.duolingo.com/Andreaja69
    Andreaja69
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    Please see my comment immediately above.

    9 months ago

    https://www.duolingo.com/iPrash
    iPrash
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    Is it ever ok to say "Él había producido lo"?

    8 months ago

    https://www.duolingo.com/Andreaja69
    Andreaja69
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    No, in this sentence the pronoun 'lo' must come immediately before the verb, 'había '.

    8 months ago