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  5. "Jag orkar inte springa längr…

"Jag orkar inte springa längre!"

Translation:I do not have the energy to run any further!

April 9, 2015

27 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/bigswedeej

This sentence is confusing and ambiguous. If you mean a longer distance, the proper word is farther, not further. Please clarify.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/devalanteriel

Added that now. Both work well, though. Quoting Oxford here:

[...] where the sense is ‘at, to, or by a greater distance’, there is no difference in meaning, and both are equally correct. Further is a much more common word, though, and is additionally used in various abstract and metaphorical contexts, for example referring to time, in which farther is unusual [...]


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Jeanbean425734

OK. So the British usage is a little different from Midwestern U.S. The definitions of farther and further are the same for us as what is stated in the Oxford Dictionary, but "farther" is the more common word. We almost exclusively use "farther" for distance and "further" in more abstract contexts. When referring to time, we use "longer" instead of "further." So "further" is a much less used word here overall. But that might be different in other parts of the U.S.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/satwita

Funny, I thought the Oxford Dictionary preferred English usage to American.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Jeanbean425734

It does. This DuoLingo course prefers American, I've been told, but the mods try to accommodate as many options as is practical.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Jeanbean425734

Thanks for adding "farther"! I like to get marked correct when I know I've translated the sentence correctly! :D


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/BrianClift1

Why not accept this: "I cannot bear to run anymore"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/devalanteriel

Can you really use "cannot bear to" for not having enough energy? I don't think I've ever seen it in that sense.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Lng52-._

dvalanteriel: My translation (incorrect?) was, "I do not have to run any further". How did Duo come up with the word 'energy"? Doesn't "energy = "energi"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/TopRival75

Att orka means to have enough energy to do something.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Jeanbean425734

"...to run any farther" should be accepted.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/John210530

Why not "I haven't the energy to run any further"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/John210530

Or, indeed, "I haven't got the energy to run any further"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/devalanteriel

That's fine, adding that. We accepted "further" everywhere, but it seems "any further" was missing in a few translations.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JavadMousa3

Exact great britain translstion


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/TopRival75

Any particular reason "att" isn't needed here? Is orkar one of those verbs that doesn't need it?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/devalanteriel

Exactly - orka is a modal verb, so it doesn't take the att.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Wowa269009

I always thought that att örka is to dare.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/-Jon-Snow-

Does this refer to distance or time in swedish or is it ambiguous?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/devalanteriel

It's ambiguous in Swedish.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JuliaOster2

There is no enough as an option


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/devalanteriel

The default translation doesn't use enough. :)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LeonK.14

“I do not have any energy to run further“ should be accepted too.

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