"It is a sandwich, is it not?"

Translation:Ceapaire atá ann, nach ea?

3 years ago

10 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/CaspervanZyl
CaspervanZyl
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I am still struggling with the copula! Why would 'Is ceapaire é' not be acceptable for the first part of the sentence? Thanks!

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/scilling
scilling
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Given the lack of context, Is ceapaire é, nach ea? should be just as acceptable as Ceapaire atá ann, nach ea?.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Silverflam3
Silverflam3
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Would "Ceapaire is ea é, nach ea" be acceptable?

5 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/lordy.byro
lordy.byro
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Should "ch" in "nach ea" be pronounced as slender or broad?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Radoslaw182
Radoslaw182
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Why not Tá sé ceapaire, nach ea? ?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Brandon87199

You can't connect two nouns in irish with that verb.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Gavin549841
Gavin549841
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Is ceapaire é, ní hea?

8 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Silverflam3
Silverflam3
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No, "ní hea" is a negative statement. That says "it is a sandwich, it is not." You need the "nach" for the question "isn't it?"

5 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/TreasaWilson

Can anyone explain the difference between "Ceapaire atá ann" and "Is ceapaire é" please? Also, what is the meaning of 'ann' here?

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Thinker.ie
Thinker.ie
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A sandwich (which) is there vs. It is a sandwich. Ann, generally means 'there. But it varies somewhat. There is little difference in the two sentences you wrote - that is, no significant difference when translated to English, but in Irish it offers the speaker to begin with 'ceapaire'.

Also, I don't think it has the exact same meaning of 'there' in English. In Irish, you would say 'Spring is there' to express 'it is Spring'.

there, that is, 'in existence'.

1 month ago
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