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  5. "Íocann an madra don chat."

"Íocann an madra don chat."

Translation:The dog pays for the cat.

April 10, 2015

52 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Oisin96

Wow either the Irish land is so magical that animals walk and talk and do the shopping and the cooking or duolingo just ran out of sentences to use..


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DSDragon

The sillier sentences help me to understand the grammar involved without thinking about it too hard, like i would be with sentences that make sense.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Ceern

Yes. This is why i love Duolingo. No learning of ' tourist phrases' off by heart.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/bob1745

A Leithéid de Dhraíocht!!!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/TobyBartels

Does this mean that the dog pays a bill owed by the cat, or that the dog is purchasing the cat?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/scilling

The former — don chat is used for paying on behalf of the cat. (As an gcat would be used instead for purchasing the cat.)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Ungewitig_Wiht

Does that structure always cause eclipsing?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/scilling

As an chat would be used in Ulster Irish.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/lorenagay

I just love this sentence....I always think of the cat doing something bad (like knocking something breakable down) but not getting caught, and then the dog gets nailed for the crime....


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MarkAdams211319

You've watched too many cartoons, like me.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DanielPere25094

excuse me, why "don" sounds like "gon" in this sentence?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/evanhearne

Yeah its annoying


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/finnplek

Similarly confused. Is that how it's meant to be pronounced? Or an error in the speech?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AlanS181824

It's just a dialectal thing - it can be 'don' too.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/grainemhaol

Is 'gon' the Connaught dialect please?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mikeinkerry

... she says "gun hut" not "dun hut" What dialect is this?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SatharnPHL

In Connacht Irish, certain d's are pronounced g. Aside from this example, dul is usually pronounced gul in Connacht Irish.

Cad atá ag dul dó? - https://www.duolingo.com/comment/4775581
Tá sé ag dul faoi obráid - https://www.duolingo.com/comment/11806896


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mikeinkerry

I meet people from Connacht and Munster every day, but I never heard one that makes the "D" sound so much like a hard "G" as in this audio. It's more like the softer "J". A new experience for me.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/smok_arman

How can I say "The dog pays to the cat?"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/scilling

Íocann an madra leis an gcat.

(The usual English phrasing would be “The dog pays the cat”.)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MarkAdams211319

I thought that don also translated as "to the".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/hpfan5

does the word 'Íocann' translate only in the sense of monetary payment or also in the English idiomatic 'pay for it' retribution sense also?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/FionaOnDuoL

Both, I would say.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/FrederickEason

Is "for the" here in the sense of paying the shopkeeper to receive the cat, or paying in the cat's place?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/FionaOnDuoL

Paying on behalf of the cat.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Damon510780

Why isn't it "pays for a cat" when the article "an chat" isn't there?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LeeInCalif

I think because "don" is a contraction that includes the definite article: don = "do + an" So, "don" is "for the" whereas "do" is "for a"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/morgan846031

I typed in the correct answer and Duolingo said that I was wrong.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SatharnPHL

This is a user-to-user Sentence Discussion. If you believe that Duolingo is malfunctioning, then take a screenshot that demonstrates the problem, and submit it with a bug report, with full details of the platform that you're using (device, app version, browser version, screen resolution, etc).


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ChristieBo640612

is 'don' contracting the words meaning 'for the'? "do+an"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/trinitythex

I was thinking the same thing...so I am curious as well :D


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/110soldr

I love these funny sentences because they make you think.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/xX_Abby_Xx1

Sóinseáil = Change Airgead = Money/Silver Cheannaigh = Bought Just thought this would be useful


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/pamhsiehca

Why not "mhadra"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SatharnPHL

There is nothing to cause lenition there - in the nominative case an only lenites feminine nouns, but madra is a masculine noun.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Aliun3

The answer accepted for "iocaim don fhear" was "I pay the man" so one is incorrect


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Aliun3

Or if both are correct both should be accepted


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SatharnPHL

I can't find any íocaim don fhear exercise, but if it accepts "I pay the man" then it is incorrect (or it's a béarlachas using do for "to" instead of "for").

Íocann tú don mhairteoil - "You pay for the beef"
Íocaim don chailín - "I pay for the girl"
Íocann sibh don fhear - "You pay for the man"
"You pay for the man" - Íocann sibh don fhear


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Aliun3

It may have been "Iocann se don fhear". Whatever the case, it occurs repeatedly and "[...] pay[s] the man" is always accepted. Thanks for the correction.

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