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  5. "Ich treffe gern neue Leute."

"Ich treffe gern neue Leute."

Translation:I like meeting new people.

September 10, 2013

56 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/The_Number_e

Shouldn't it be kennenlernen instead of treffen? Doesn't treffen mean something like have a meeting with?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Adriano.Marcato

Indeed, I think of treffen not as getting to know someone, or being introduced, but rather as running into or seeing someone as planned. I would like a native to tell me I'm wrong.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Tuibiel

It stands for "have a meeting with" and "hit". As hit it can be used pretty much like "hit" in English: hit up with, hit somewhere, hit someone.

By the way, Treffen stands for meeting in the sense of reunion, so there's that.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/arangelovivan

is it strong inflection here? for "NEUE"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AvivAv

should´t be Ich treffe neue Leute gern?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/WolfStriker1

Unless your emphasizing "gern," it typically follows the verb it's modifying.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/the_pinguin

i meet new people gladly. Why not?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/leilani238

It's a construction that doesn't translate word-for-word to English (might count as idiomatic). When I took German in school, we learned the "<subject> <verb> gern" as the way to say "<subject> likes <verb-ing>", e.g. "Ich wandere gern" for "I like hiking", and only used modal verb constructions later. That being said, I wouldn't say "I meet new people gladly" should not be accepted, since although it sounds odd in English, well, so do many DL sentences....


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/aistomin

What about "I meet new people with pleasure"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/az_p
Mod
  • 3

I think that falls into the 'not incorrect but odd' category. Keep it simple and follow leilani238's tip.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RickrInSF

How about " I am gladly meeting new people"? The problem, for me, with the translation of "i like meeting new people" is that it does not mean that you are currently meeting the people, which i believe that the german sentence does mean.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/az_p
Mod
  • 3

The German sentence does not mean "currently". It could, as German doesn't have a present continuing tense, but it would usually be interpreted as being a general statement about what you like doing.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JTO-MTL

"I'm glad to meet new people." sounds to this native English speaker quite normal.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DannyOcean

That has a slightly different meaning than "I like meeting new people". Doing it gladly implies you are willing to do it, but sometimes you gladly do things that you don't like. Liking something is more internal.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RickrInSF

yes "i like meeting new people" is different, just like "ich mag neue Leute treffen" is different from "ich treffe gern neue Leute"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/G_44

I do not understand your explanation. What is the difference between "ich mag neue Leute treffen" and "ich treffe gern neue Leute" ?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/az_p
Mod
  • 3

RickrInSF's first sentence actually has incorrect grammar. It would need to be something like Ich mag es, neue Leute zu treffen. The meaning is the same as Ich treffe gern neue Leute.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/G_44

When do we use 'mag' and when do we use 'gern'?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/az_p
Mod
  • 3

In reply to G_44: Read this.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/G_44

In reply to the "mögen, gern, gefallen – What is the difference" link you shared -- THANK YOU! This is very helpful. Have a lingot.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/TalithaVin

Why is it neue? And not neuen? Since the accusativus plural usually goes with -en


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/dpcoon

I think it's a case of strong inflection (where there's no article). The adjective in the accusative plural case takes an 'e' ending.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/za_2001

Why "I am happy to meet new people" is not accepted? (I am not english)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/az_p
Mod
  • 3

It means something slightly different.

"I like to meet new people" or "I gladly meet new people" are general statements about you - that you basically always feel this way.

"I am happy to meet new people" sounds more specific to the present moment.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/cowacola

I'm probably dumb for asking this, but why isn't it "sich treffen"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/TheNewDawn.

Use 'sich treffen mit' when the time is set/scheduled to meet. But in this sentence it is all unplanned.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/UrbanLegend13

When do we use "sich" with "treffen" in the sentences?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/az_p
Mod
  • 3

jemanden treffen = "to meet someone (by chance, unplanned)", e.g. to serendipitously run into someone you know while shopping

sich mit jemandem treffen = "to meet [with] someone (planned)", e.g. to agree with a friend to have coffee together one afternoon next week

Using pons.com will help with this kind of thing.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/berr

Why is I like to meet with new people not accepted? I understand there was no "mit" in the german version, but to my Kenntniss von Englisch it sounds about right. Anyone care to comment?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/az_p
Mod
  • 3

I think it is indeed because there's no mit in the German sentence. Even in English, "to meet with someone" implies that it was planned in advance but "to meet someone" doesn't necessarily. These roughly correspond to the difference between sich mit jemandem treffen and jemanden treffen in German, although the latter (as in this translation exercise) is usually explicitly unplanned.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/CCalnero

Can somebody explain when to use gern vs. gerne?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Chocolatey55

They are interchangeable. But using using one might just sound better than the other. Gern is just a shortened version of gerne, since sometimes the -e on the end of words is dropped off in casual usage.

http://german.stackexchange.com/questions/4124/when-to-use-gern-vs-gerne


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Suraj1991

gerne vs gern -> how to go about it?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/az_p
Mod
  • 3

In everyday communication, either is fine. I was told that gern is slightly informal, though, and should not be used in formal written situations such as job applications, etc.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Chocolatey55

It's posted above, they are quite interchangeable and it is up to you on which to use. Some people might say 'Ich hab' zwei Bücher' vs 'Ich habe...' Similar thing going on.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/CheesyCakeu

Is there a difference between this and "Ich gerne neue Leute treffen"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/TheNewDawn.

ALWAYS remember that 2nd Position is a verb, NOT an adverb. 'Gerne' in this case is an adverb. And your 2nd example is not right yet


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/CheesyCakeu

Ah, vielen Dank! So what would be the correct sentence for my example, if I may ask?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/TheNewDawn.

"Ich treffe gern neue Leute,"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ClintBalza

If you say ' ich mag gern neue leute' does it mean the same?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/TheNewDawn.

That would mean "I like new people gladly,"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DorinDorin4

Is there a reason 'I meet gladly new people' isn't accepted?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/az_p
Mod
  • 3

The word order is incorrect in English.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Veselinka3

Can I translate "gerne" as "gladely"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/az_p
Mod
  • 3

Literally it means "gladly" (note the spelling), but it's often more natural to reword the sentence slightly, like Duo's example does, because it's not used as commonly in English as gerne is in German.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/GeorgeTure1

Also, I gladly meet new people is also fine.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Didu874968

Shouldn't it be either ich treffe mich gern... or ich treffe gern mit...?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/az_p
Mod
  • 3

See my comment to another user - you either use the reflexive pronoun and mit together, or neither. Doing so changes the meaning, though.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SaulSnatsky

I translate as "I gladly meet new people." That surely is the meaning of the sentence in German, whereas "Ich mag neue Leute treffen" means 'I like to meet new people," which Duo gave as the answer. I use "gern" as an adverb not a verb.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/az_p
Mod
  • 3

You're overemphasising the need for a word-for-word translation at the expense of it sounding natural in both languages. For such common expressions, idiomatic translations are often best. See the previous top comment by leilani238.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SaulSnatsky

Duo gets picky at times and on others a looser translation is accepted. I totally understand many things in German, but sometimes cannot find a translation that Duo likes. As your comment suggests, you know that language does not always have an exact translation. Thank you for your comment.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Scintilla72

On a whim, I tried "I like hitting new people" and was rejected.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Mart337658

But there are two answers to this phrase : Ich treffe gern neue Leute Ich treffe gern mit neue Leute


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SaulSnatsky

This little sentence has caused a flood of comments. Basically, I would not blink if a German speaker spoke that sentence. I got it. The speaker likes to meet new people. If you want you can translate it using the progressive, since German does not have one, but the concept is the important thing.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Finzig

'I like to meet new people' is good English and should be accepted. I will report it.

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