"Tugann sé bia dóibh i gcónaí."

Translation:He always gives them food.

3 years ago

7 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/Ballygawley
Ballygawley
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What is the difference in pronounciation between daoibh (= you) and dóibh (= them).

For me the beginning of "dóibh" sounds approximately like "do" in English, and the beginning of "daoibh" in the "dia daoibh" (phrases section) sounds like a "g".

(I am aware of the presumed shortcomings of the reader, and intention was not to question or criticize that.)

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/galaxyrocker

In some dialects, the beginning of daoibh is a voiced velar fricative, /ɣ/, which is generally associated with slender <dh> and <gh>. That's why you often will see it written dhaoibh in those dialects.

The beginning of dóibh, however, is /d̪ˠ/, closer to the English /d/. Also, there should be a different vowel sound, with <aoi> representing /iː/ and <ói> representing /o:/.

Also, they're not presumed shortcomings; they're actual ones. Like here. See adds an extra vowel in dóibh, instead of just slenderizing the <bh>

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Ballygawley
Ballygawley
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Thanks, good job once more.

The inital voice example at the top of the Wiki page lost me, but the other language samples really did help (damalige / jag). (Also I had to go back to the phrases section to check whether I made a mistake with the quotation of "dia daoibh" vs. "dhaoibh" ;-)

(BTW, now having come to this level it really gives me joy to think that I do recognize about every 5th word on RnaG, which is always on in the car --> almost some idea, what the topic is, so I do not doubt that this is a decent way to learn a language)

http://www.rte.ie/rnag/

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/BardAaron

Doesnt "i gconaí" mean "at home?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Prony-dH-Bray

@Aaron, It means always. At home is sa bhaile or ar bhaile. You are probably thinking of 'tá mé i mo chónaí sa Fhrainc, tá siad ina gcónaí in Éirinn': i/they live in France/Ireland.

In that case, you are saying: I am residing/dwelling in France , etc.

By extention, i gcónaí is a state of affair that is perpetually dwelling in that state, resting/settling in that state: in other words, always...

http://www.teanglann.ie/ga/fgb/Cónaí

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jimpat67

Why is it marked wrong when always is at the end of the sentence. This is very frustrating.

5 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Prony-dH-Bray

Because in English always does not go at the end unless you put a special emphasis.

He does. Always. She would ask, always.

The Irish sentence did not carry any distinct emphasis.

5 months ago
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