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"Zij gaat haar man vinden."

Translation:She is going to find her husband.

3 years ago

13 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/zarredondo
zarredondo
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What about "she is going to find her man?"

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DrBreakalot

I don't think man can be used in this context in English

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/belgieman
belgieman
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I put the same thing. Man is quite often used as a replacement for husband.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/dkpwatson

Yes and the sense I took is, "She's going to find/get her man" even implying that she knows who she will marry. DuoLingo is a great resource and while it 's important to be precise when learning, marking translations, which appear in on-line and printed (VD) dictionaries, as incorrect irritates- as you can probably tell.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/El2theK
El2theK
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Haar man always refers to someone's husband. Also not all definitions from a dictionary are correct in every sentence.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MokeiAkita

How would one express "her man" or "her guy" in the context that she and he are tightly bound in a romantic relationship, but not married? "Vriend" doesn't really seem expressive enough. And I'm not at all sure of the Dutch for "boyfriend" which seems a little tame for an adult, or "lover" which might be a little too explicit for general conversation.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/El2theK
El2theK
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@MokeiAkita: Vriend is used by people from all ages and hence haar/zijn vriend provides the context that they are in a relationship.

Alternatively one could use partner, though arguably that sounds a bit stiff and formal.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/dkpwatson

Thank you and sorry for any grumpiness.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/nzcanadian

"She goes to find her husband" is not accepted, even though it would be a literal translation of this sentence. Does any use of "Zij gaat..." or "Zij zul" mean we need to assume a tense change?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Susande
Susande
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Gaat does change the tense in this case, see how this works here (first part is about zullen the second part about gaan): http://www.dutchgrammar.com/en/?n=Verbs.re18

Maybe I'm nitpicking here, but She goes to find her husband in the meaning of She goes in order to find her husband would be Ze gaat om haar man te vinden (it needs om).

Regarding your question:

Zullen normally doesn't exist on it's own so it indeed indicates a tense change (the only exception I can think of right now is Dat zal wel, which is the Dutch equivalent of Yeah, right spoken in a saracastic way).

Gaan can often replace zullen (see explanation in the link) which the same function so the same tense change, but it can also be used to mean to go.

  • ik ga = I go
  • ik zal gaan = I will go
  • ik ga gaan > not used in standard Dutch
  • ik ga weg = I go away
  • ik ga eten = I'm going to eat
  • ik zal eten = I will eat
  • ik zal gaan eten > doesn't really work in English I think, it's like I'm going to eat but a bit further in the future

If gaan is at the beginning of the sentence and there are one or more verbs at the end, you can assume it's the 'future' gaan. Also time indicators like morgen, volgende week can help (not always, see below):

  • Ik ga morgen met vrienden voetballen = I'm going to play football with friends tomorrow
  • We gaan met de auto rijden = We're going to drive by car (this is more natural in Dutch than in English)

In the meaning of to go (no additional verbs):

  • Ik ga morgen = I will go tomorrow (tricky one…it's present tense so in the meaning of to go…but used referring to the future, nice example of Dutch leniency with tenses)
  • We gaan met de auto = We go by car/We'll go by car (tense in English not know, Dutch tense leniency again)
3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Brijsven
Brijsven
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Edit: I'm going to have to retract my thoughts towards the acceptance of "She goes to find her husband." I did not fully think about the listed correct translation and the proposed additional translation. I am leaning in agreement with Susande.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Corvette2001
Corvette2001
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Correct me if i am wrong, but is...echtgenoot...not the proper translation for husband? If man=man, and man=husband, does that then infer that every man is a husband?

10 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/El2theK
El2theK
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No, possessive + man = husband, so no, not every man is a husband.

10 months ago