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"Het snelle paard loopt."

Translation:The fast horse is walking.

0
3 years ago

31 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/Voyta
Voyta
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En het snelle paard rent niet, which means it's probably not fully using its potential.

14
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ShiroiSasori
ShiroiSasori
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But it walks very fast!

3
Reply2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Rae.F
Rae.F
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6
Reply2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/christiaan81
christiaan81Plus
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'The rapid horse walks' is this bad English?

2
Reply2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Yurell
Yurell
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Yes; we would say 'the fast (or quick) horse walks/is walking'. 'Rapid' tends to be used to describe fast rates of change (e.g. rapid growth, rapid development), rather than nouns for objects (with the exception of water).

2
Reply2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Rae.F
Rae.F
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But "growth" and "development" are nouns.

I see nothing wrong with "rapid horse". It sounds fine to my native English-speaking ears.

1
Reply2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Voyta
Voyta
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They are both abstract nouns. "Horse" is not abstract and a "rapid horse" sounds nowhere near fine to my non-native English-speaking ears.

2
Reply2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Yurell
Yurell
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As Voyta said, the other two are abstract nouns, that don't describe physical objects. I'm a native speaker too, and 'rapid horse' sounds completely alien to me. The only non-abstract noun that I would apply 'rapid' to is 'water', and even then I'm more likely to make it the adverb 'rapidly' and apply it to what the water's doing.

1
Reply2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Delire6
Delire6
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Help! I'm lost here... Is Flemish that different from Nederlands? I'm a french speaker from Belgium and I always learned at school that "lopen" means "to run", and "wandelen" means "to walk" ? Thanks

2
Reply1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Yurell
Yurell
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In Belgium it means (or can mean) 'to run', while in the Netherlands it (usually) means 'to walk'

2
Reply1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Delire6
Delire6
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Thanks Yurell!

0
Reply1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DariaLaura2

Is 'lopen' not running?

1
Reply2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Rae.F
Rae.F
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I asked my friend who is a native Dutch speaker:

Hey, Dutch question. Does "lopen" mean both "to walk" and "to run"? What's the most common way to say "to walk" and "to run"?

The act of walking is "lopen". Hiking and walking for pleasure is "wandelen". Running is "rennen" or "hardlopen". "Hardlopers zijn doodlopers" = going too fast will kill you.

So it's wrong when translators say that "lopen" also means "to run"?

Not necessarily. "De tentoonstelling loopt van januari to december". The exhibition runs from January to December. That kind of running.

Ah. But it does not mean "run" in the sense of body locomotion.

10
Reply12 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DariaLaura2

But i live in belgium and i swear if i tell someone 'loop' he/she will start running. I think it is because of the location?

5
Reply2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MatijaRotk
MatijaRotk
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I live also in Belgium and here lopen means running.

4
Reply1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Rae.F
Rae.F
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Probably. Vocabulary and usage will vary from dialect to dialect. My friend is from Frisland.

1
Reply2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Lerura
Lerura
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I would if someone told me so, as it is fairly close to the danish word "løb" (run)

1
Reply1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Matt154778
Matt154778
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Can someone explain for me why in this sentence "snelle" is used and not "snel" when describing paard which is a "het" word? I thought the addition of -e was only used for adjectives describing "de" words.

1
Reply1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Yurell
Yurell
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'Het' words only drop the -e if they're preceded by an indefinite article (e.g. 'een'), so for the definite article you have 'het snelle paard' vs the indefinite article 'een snel paard'.

3
Reply1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JemezFred

I don't think I will ever be able to get this right. Level 8 and still nowhere close.

2
Reply5 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Rae.F
Rae.F
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The only way to get it is practice, practice, practice. Don't feel you need to move on to the next lesson just because you've finished the previous one. Instead of continuing on, stick around and review, review, review.

2
Reply5 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Abcd687185

I think I could learn this by associating it with the Norwegian verb 'å løpe' which means 'to run'. It's close enough to walking!

1
Reply1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Yurell
Yurell
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What's the difference between this and 'het snelle paard is aan het lopen'? From what I understand, the translation 'the fast horse is walking' applies to that statement too, and I normally translate this as 'the fast horse walks'; am I being confused by tenses?

0
Reply2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Voyta
Voyta
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You are right that "Het paard loopt" covers both present simple and present continuous. But if you want to emphasize that it's really happening right now, that's when you should use "Het paard is aan het lopen".

3
Reply2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Yurell
Yurell
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Okay, thank you for the clarification ^_^

0
Reply12 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/TheoneF1

Het snelle paard loopt? - Site translation: The fast horse is walking or walks. Loop- run, hij loopt- he runs. My answer was the fast horse runs which is apparently wrong. So not sure I understand this twist taking the word from run to be walk especially since there is a motion for horse "galop".

0
Reply1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Yurell
Yurell
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From the discussion above, it seems to be a dialectical difference between Belgian and Netherlands Dutch: in the former, 'lopen' is 'to run', while in the latter it means 'to walk'.

2
Reply1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/TheoneF1

Ah, thank you very much for that. It does seem to be a bit of difference between Nederlands and Belgian. I've seen it previously with "Groente" meaning vegetables in Nederlands but it is "Groenten" in Dutch and I had a hard time with it for a bit.

0
Reply1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/arnoldus
arnoldus
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It should be accepting "running" as well, that is the meaning in Belgium.

0
Reply1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/RifkiN2

Paard has an article of "het". It's supposed to be Het snel paard.

0
Reply3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/El2theK
El2theK
Mod
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No

  • Het paard - het snelle paard - een snel paard
  • De hond - de snelle hond - een snelle hond
1
Reply13 months ago