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"Tháinig mé ar an airgead."

Translation:I found the money.

3 years ago

14 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/FeargalMcGovern

"Tháinig mé ar" I find this makes more sense in translation if I think of it as "came upon"

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/gufcfan
gufcfan
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That is what it means when you translate it literally.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ncarolinasailor

Can this be used in the idiomatic sense "I came into money"?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Prony-dH-Bray

The idiomatic translation of that is 'oidhreacht a fháil' = to get an inheritance. 'tháinig mé ar' would not sound right, I'd think. More likely, 'tháinig mé in airgead', 'tháinig mé isteach ar an airgead', 'thit airgead liom', 'thit airgead orm'.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/gufcfan
gufcfan
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More likely, 'tháinig mé in airgead', 'tháinig mé isteach ar an airgead', 'thit airgead liom', 'thit airgead orm'.

You can't say any of these unfortunately. They are variations of the English idiom.


oidhreacht a fháil

... is probably the best.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/joebloggins

In the Newfoundland dialect, "come across" is much more common than "come upon"

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/freymuth
freymuth
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Not just in Newfoundland, buddy.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/gufcfan
gufcfan
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Don't confuse what you are learning here with Newfoundland ;)

Tháinig mé transa ar x / I came across x

... is used in Irish also.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/PfifltriggPi
PfifltriggPi
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Dialect of what, Irish or English?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/coreycrowther

Mise freisin

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/becky3086
becky3086
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Why does it need "ar"?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/galaxyrocker

If we were to translate it more literally, it'd be like the English "I came upon the money.". It's what's known as a phrasal verb, and the ar is required with tháinig to give it the meaning of 'found'.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JayLozinsk

Why doesn't "I found the silver" work? What if I'm treasure hunting?!

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Knocksedan

It doesn't work because it suggests that you looked the answer up in the dictionary. In modern Irish, when people say airgead, they're talking about money, not a shiny metal.

If you're learning Irish for the purpose of communicating with other speakers, assume that airgead="money", unless the context is quite specifically talking about the metal/element. "No context" really doesn't justify using dictionary translations that will be misleading or confusing if you're trying to use what you learn to communicate with someone else.

1 year ago