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"Rijdt er een bus naar de stad?"

Translation:Is there a bus into town?

3 years ago

18 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/Gement
GementPlus
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If I wanted to ask, "Does this bus go to the city?" which of these would work?

Rijdt deze bus naar de stad? Gaat deze bus naar de stad?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Milly12354

Both

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/2200Lucia60
2200Lucia60
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Hi Gement. Because I am less good in English than you are, I like to ask you, "Is there a bus into town?", does this sentence really reflects the <moving idea> that contents the Dutch sentence. I mean, I would translate the English as "Is er een bus in (binnen) de stad?" and not "Rijdt er een bus NAAR de stad?". As a matter of fact, I translated the Dutch one into "Does a bus is GOING TO the city?", to make clear the bus must come from outside moving towards the city centre. Unfortunately, my version has been rejected, but I still don't understand why. Could you enlighten me? Thank you previously, Lu

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Gement
GementPlus
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"Into" has the sense of direction. You go INTO a place from outside. "To" and "Into" can often be used with the same meaning. The difference is whether the place is a container.

  • "I go from start TO finish." (No container.)

  • "I go TO/INTO the city." (A city can contain things, but is also a dot on the map, so both are correct. I would probably say "to" for a trip across the country, but "into" for my specific shopping trip.)

  • "I go INTO the box." (Container I am inside.)

"In" does not have direction. You are in (inside) a place without moving. "I am IN/INSIDE the box."

"Does a bus go to the city" is good grammar and has the same meaning, but the natural US English is "Is there a bus into the city?" The emphasis is on the bus existing so it is possible to go to the city.

"Into town" is a more specific phrase. Without "the" or "a", this town must be the only possible town, and the speaker is not in a town. You could be out walking or biking in the country, but then you want to go back into town. Or you could be at a hotel in a village but want to go into Amsterdam.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/2200Lucia60
2200Lucia60
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Gement, I assure you, you couldn't be more exhaustive and clear in explaining why the Dutch sentence is being translated with an American sentence that not seemed to contain the moving aspect, while it does have in fact! An enlightenment about typical American way of "behaving" and speaking.Just great! Thank you.Good luck and enjoy your day, Lu

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Tina_in_Bristol
Tina_in_Bristol
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I'm glad you think: "Does a bus go to the city?" would be fine, because I have just translated it exactly that way, but been marked wrong, so have reported it. Here (UK) "Is there a bus to...?" or "Does a bus go to...?" are both fine.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/El2theK
El2theK
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  • Is er een bus (binnen) de stad? - Is there a bus (with)in the town?

This sentence does not indicate direction/action

Your sentence: Does a bus is going to the city? - fails on the use on the is going to, I'll have a look at the sentence and see if there are alternatives that are/should be accepted.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Nosepicker3

Is there a more direct way of asking this question? It seems that without "is er", it almost seems as if this is an informal, incomplete sentence being asked, "ride a bus into town?"

Can I say "Is er een bus naar de stad?"

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/El2theK
El2theK
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It's not an informal or incomplete sentence. Though, "Is er een bus naar de stad?" is also correct.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/PetitRenar
PetitRenar
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Hi, why is: "Is there a bus to go to the city?" not an acceptable answer?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JonasLismont

Yes, my "Does a bus go to the city" was rejected :(

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/talideon
talideon
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You wouldn't use 'to go', but rather 'going' - this is something that happens habitually. If it were a one-off event, then 'to go' would make more sense, but even then, people would tend to use 'going'.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/harryclark17
harryclark17Plus
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I think that "to go to the city" would imply that you would take the bus "to go to the city". I think that "Is there a bus going to the city" would be more apt.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/legalskier

I think context here would be helpful. For example, if the person asking knew there are busses departing the city but wanted specifically to go into the city it would make more sense.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/FreekVerkerk
FreekVerkerk
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"Is there a bus going to town? " What is wrong with this translation?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/maxrojo

Should "Is there a bus travelling to the city?" be accepted?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/The_Dutch_Girl

Why was "Is there a bus to town" not accepted?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/EnricoClem2

This seems a difficult exercise because usually duolingo is all about translate literally even when it sounds awkward in english. Here the correct translation is too far removed from the literal translation and the litteral translation is too awkward. I think everyone understands what this means but it's difficult to guess what combo of literal and "actual" translation the system expects you to input.

1 year ago