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"¡Por favor para!"

Translation:Please stop!

4
4 years ago

103 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/elienos

Would you use a comma in this instance, in Spanish? THis sentence seemed very confusing to me. I was thinking "para" was "for" I didn't think of the indicative of "stop." I thought it was some dicho that I don't know yet.

132
Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Babella

Yes, I would use a comma: "¡Por favor, para!".

79
Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AtaraxianSpa

This is para the verb though, the infinitive of which is parar. Parar has two conjugations which come out as para; the 3rd person singular in present tense, and the 2nd person singular imperative tense.
http://www.spanishdict.com/conjugate/parar

67
Reply73 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JohnHatchell

It depends on how you mean it, like in English. "Please, stop!" or "Please stop!".

24
Reply23 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/TheGreatAce

Could it be "Por favor, alto!"?

11
Reply1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mjelb
mjelb
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I got credit for "Por favor, alto!"

4
Reply1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ZinC19
ZinC19
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In "El patrőn del mal, a Colombian TV show about Pablo Escobar, you'd hear them saying to the driver "Pare! Pare!".. (When they, for instance, are in a 'matar' mission :) )

3
Reply2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Talca
Talca
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Glad you wrote this. It reminds us that the DL sentence is the informal TÚ form vs. the PARE, formal usted form.

4
Reply2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/popa910
popa910
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Just to clarify, "pare" is a subjunctive form; it's used when giving commands.

8
Reply2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/sidrsharma

Man are you talking about Narcos? Or something else?

1
Reply2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ZinC19
ZinC19
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No, not the Netflix serie 'Narcos' which's new and still ongoing. 'El patrón del mal' is a Colombian TV show from 2012.

3
Reply2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/sidrsharma

Ohh alright cool. Nevertheless, your comment made me remember this so thanks! Haha.

3
Reply2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/vartaks
vartaks
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This sentence reminded me of the words "paraguas", "parasol" and "parachute".

63
Reply73 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/tyeNewton

Paraguas: "Water stopper" Parasol: "Sun stopper" My mind: "Explodes"

139
Reply133 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Pigslew
Pigslew
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And parabrisas "Breeze stopper". Probably many more.

16
Reply2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/malkeynz
malkeynz
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Parachute = paracaídas = "fall stopper" or "stops falls".

43
Reply2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/tyeNewton

¡Lo quiero!

11
Reply2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/UmaObasi
UmaObasiPlus
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So would "Para para la paragua" mean "Stop at the umbrella" ?

6
Reply11 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/winandfx

"stop for the umbrell", i think.) It is paraguaS.

4
1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Evan.Tracy

Also, chute in English means shot, so parachute = shot stopper. I guess you could think of being "shot" out of an airplane when you go skydiving?

0
Reply2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JuanitaJacobs

Genius!

5
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/sdtrask1
sdtrask1
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Yes, excellent! Thanks.

1
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Rich__K
Rich__K
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Would "¡por favor, alto!" be a valid translation?

9
Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/THeNeeno

That doesn't sound right to me at all. 'Alto' as 'stop' is always a noun or an interjection. I guess you could say it, but if you insisted on saying it, this is one of the rare times that I would think it preferable to say 'por favor' at the end. I just wouldn't do it at all.

Somebody who has the authority to demand that you 'Halt!' is not likely to say 'please'. I've never heard anybody use them together, but I can't tell you it's grammatically incorrect. 'Parar' is a verb and can be used politely or shouted. It has a much wider range of usefulness. You can use it in almost every sense of the English verb 'stop'. The noun 'parada' can be used for most uses of the English noun 'stop'.

13
Reply13 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/bal7774

How about when another person is teasing you? You usually say "please stop!"

1
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/THeNeeno

That's why I chose the word "Halt!" which is more closely related to 'alto'. It may vary by region, but you are more likely to use the verbs 'parar' or 'dejar (de)'. We don't usually say 'alto'. That's more like something a police officer would shout at you.

5
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ghayle16
ghayle16
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How about the word Deténgase? It means stop as well right? Cual es la diferencia entre los dos?(para y detangase)

0
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/THeNeeno

Yes, they can be synonyms. Detener can also mean to detain, to confine, to delay.

5
Reply2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Evan.Tracy

Yes, I run into "Detente!" a lot in the Spanish to English tree. (my reverse tree)

1
Reply2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ghayle16
ghayle16
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Thank you :)

0
Reply2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/e.bella_
e.bella_
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I've learnt that in Mexico and Central America, you see the word 'Alto' on road signs meaning 'Halt.' In my opinion, I wouldn't really think that you would add a 'please' if asking someone to 'halt'. It just seems more of a command than a request. So I wouldn't say it should be valid, even though the meanings are very similar. I'm not an expert though, so don't take my word for it. It may be perfectly fine to use :)

7
Reply13 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Inqvisitor1
Inqvisitor1
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Well the imperative is by its very nature still a command. And "Por favor PARA" is in the imperative mood. It's a command, not a request, even if a polite one. A request is asking, not telling, e.g. "Would you stop, please?" or to make it even gentler "Would you mind stopping, please?"

"Por favor para", you are still telling/commanding the person to "stop", not asking.

"Alto" on the other hand is a noun, but in its common use e.g. on road signs it is also an INTERJECTION, which is its own part of speech. And which is indeed more curt & typically harsher than a command. It carries a connotation of URGENCY, immediacy.

An example in English turning noun into interjection, shouting "Silence!" (Actually in colloquial English people sometimes borrow Spanish "Silencio!")

Which is a much more curt & forceful way of way of saying "Be SILENT right NOW!". "Silence." as a noun cannot ordinarily be a complete sentence, but it can as an interjection meaning "Let there be silence."

Another example of an interjection which both English & Spanish share is "Caution!" "¡Cuidado!" that you can find on bright yellow signs. It's not a command form from a verb which would maybe be like "Use caution!" or "Be cautious!" in English. In Spanish using the imperative verb form of "cuidar" like "¡Cuídate!" or "¡Cuídese!" doesn't carry the sense of urgency, it would be more like saying "Take care of yourself!", not an urgent "Careful!", don't come any closer, there's high voltage power lines right here that will electrocute you.

There's no rule against adding "Please" or "Por favor" to those signs underneath "Caution!"/"¡Cuidado!", but it would kinda defeat the point of interjections and the curt one-word sense of urgency they convey.

But a teacher frustrated by a class full of noisy unruly students might scream "SILENCE!" Then take a deep breath and sigh out "Please!" to soften the harshness of her outburst.

4
Reply110 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Agent_Gabriel

I've seen this phrase's usage in some Japanese films with subtitles.

5
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/cleespann

why not "please stop"?

3
Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jrikhal
jrikhal
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Please stop! (with exclamation mark) seems to be accepted since Duo shows it as the best answer on this discussionpage.

4
Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Rsquared226

Yes, but Duo usually accepts answers with missing exclamation marks

4
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/GaelBraxton

Rsquared226: I've been working on Duolingo for 2 years and have NEVER used punctuation on any sentence that I've translated in a lesson. The punctuation has NEVER been sited by Duolingo. Evidently their computer is not programmed for punctuation.

8
Reply2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Ladron
Ladron
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DL error which they seem to have fixed as they just accepted it from me.

2
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jillsheer

i thought that 'para' means stand according to the initial introduction of the word

3
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/alezzzix
alezzzix
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You have to remember that the reflexive form of a verb can change the whole meaning of it, "parar" means "to stop", and "pararse" means both "to stand/to stop".

6
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/PMftW9

Yup. Two sentences before this it was used as stand. Now that's not even in the dictionary hints. This program is 90% great and 10% too frustrating for words.

0
Reply8 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MattEdwards1

Would the imperative be used here? Perhaps if it was phrased "Pare, por favor!"?

2
Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/THeNeeno

Both are imperative. The difference is whether you're using tú or usted.

2
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jb4292
jb4292
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Is "para" in this sentence considered a command? If so, is it in the "tu" or "usted" form? Thanks!

2
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/alezzzix
alezzzix
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Yes, it's a command. Tú = Para / Vos = Pará / Usted = Pare / Ustedes = Paren / Vosotros = Parad

12
Reply33 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jb4292
jb4292
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Oh cool! I didn't realize there were so many other forms. Thanks.

3
Reply13 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/CJFloyd
CJFloyd
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In this same exercise para can be translated as stand. I stand here and you there. Yet here when I entered "Please stand," it was deemed to be incorrect. Any ideas as to why "Please stand" is not accepted while stand and stop are accepted as interchangeable in the sentence I stand/stop here and you there?

2
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/elissaf1
elissaf1
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As a reflexive verb, it can mean to stand (oneself) up, but this isn't a reflexive example.

3
Reply2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/axtell1989

How would you say please stand up

2
Reply2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/elissaf1
elissaf1
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Probably using the reflexive pronoun: "por favor se para".

1
Reply12 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Inqvisitor1
Inqvisitor1
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Close but not quite, "se para" is not imperative. One letter can change everything. "Se para" is the 3rd person present INDICATIVE form, you would just be saying factually "He/she/it stops/stands up." Or usted/formal "You stop/stand up."

The imperative form "para" is informal singular you/tú, so it takes "te" as object pronoun, "te para".

For formal singular you/usted imperative, you use the 3rd person present SUBJUNCTIVE form, so "se pare".

And for a reflexive imperative, the pronoun should be suffixed to the command, so for "pararse": "Por favor párese" or "Por favor párate".

"Stand up" as an alternate meaning for "pararse" is an Americanism, one could alternately use the less ambiguous "levántate" or "levántese" in the sense of telling someone who is seated/laying down to stand up.

1
Reply110 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/LazyLinguist5
LazyLinguist5
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Is there a different form when used as a command or no?

2
Reply2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DavidGoldt

just come across para, as stop, but i thought it was for ? how come

2
Reply2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/tyeNewton

It's a homonym. This is the conjugation of the verb "parar."

Friendly reminder: don't forget to read the rest of the thread before posting. : )

6
Reply2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Deo.
Deo.
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My Spanish teacher last year said some people say "porfa" instead of "por favor". Is this extremely common and would "por favor" just be used as formal?

2
Reply2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Cuitlacoche

I lived in Mexico for 2 years and heard both used commonly. "Porfa" may be more casual, but "por favor" is not just for formal talk.

1
Reply9 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/babygucci_626

And here i wanted to put "Ya Basta!" Lol

2
Reply1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Cuitlacoche

I used "Por favor, basta!" earlier in the lesson and it was accepted.

0
Reply9 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Dzordzia

Why isn't "Stop, please." accepted? Strange!?

1
Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Carianne.

Probably because "por favor" comes first and Duolingo wants to make sure you understand the literal translation word for word.

6
Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/H-Kier

Yes, I agree. Stop, please is just as good in English as please stop.

5
Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/rooseveltnut1

Most of the time Duo. wants us to be literal. Then there's the other times...............;-)

4
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Hydrogyrum
Hydrogyrum
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Why do they use the same word as "for"?

1
Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JackStewart0

Even though it has the same letters, the context would tell us that it is different. We have words in English also that have more than one meaning for the same combination of letters. Please for, didn't make much sense, but the conjugation of parar --> para did make sense.

14
Reply24 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Jimijimmy

Another thing to note is that, say that "para" meant "for." That means that "Por favor para" has no verb, and that doesn't make sense, but when "para" means stop, it now makes sense because the sentence has the verb "stop".

4
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/BBSTL

Why not Por favor Pare! Isn't Para mean (he she it) Stop?

1
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/alezzzix
alezzzix
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Pare is formal for usted, para is informal for tú, and paren is for ustedes.

4
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Talca
Talca
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STOP signs in Costa Rica say PARE on them.

3
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/alezzzix
alezzzix
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That's because they use "usted" for everything.

4
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/skepticalways

I did not remember that; thanks. But I didn't drive while I was there, either. About that comma, think of punctuation as the highway signs of speech and reading. In an emergency, if a child is about to touch something that will hurt him, you would not use the polite "please" at all. If you have time to be polite, use both the "por favor" and the comma. :-)

1
Reply2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/tylerdurden007

why not por favor parar? parar vs para? anyone help

1
Reply2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/iXPLODE

no

0
Reply2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Inqvisitor1
Inqvisitor1
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"Parar" = the infinitive, i.e. "to stop".

"Para" = the imperative command "stop!" (singular informal/tú form)

0
Reply10 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Rdrmb
Rdrmb
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No ( ͡° ͜ʖ ͡°)

1
Reply2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Neon_Trash

The kids cry out "Please stop! You're scaring me!" I'll be your bestie if you know that song.

1
Reply1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JaguarWhisperer

I love that song <3

0
Reply11 months ago