https://www.duolingo.com/profile/OneAndOnlyJosh

German Word Order Resources

I am over the Half-Way mark in my German Tree! 44/74 skills learned! The skills I have the most trouble with are just before the third checkpoint. Skills like: Modal Verbs, Genitive Case, & Adjective: Nominative, Accusative, & Dative.

I am looking for some German Word Order recourses. By that I mean a grammatical explanation of what words go where and why. Also, could you post any other websites or books that have helped you understand the German language? I will be following this Discussion as a reference for future use, so please post anything and everything that ever helped you. If you want lingots, just ask.


Here are some fun quotes by Sherlock Holmes concerning the German Language. I thought they'd be fun to share:

"Though unmusical, the German language is the most expressive of all languages". (As the spy Von Book is cursing Holmes after being outwitted by him).

"Precisely, and the man who wrote the note is a German. Do you note the peculiar construction of the sentence-'This account of you we have from all quarters received'. A Frenchman or a Russian could not have written that. It is the German who is so uncourteous to his verbs." (As Holmes and Watson are examining a note in, "A Scandal in Bohemia".)

April 16, 2015

12 Comments


[deactivated user]

    Hi Captain America16, Here is the link I found on the topic.

    http://www.dartmouth.edu/~german/Grammatik/WordOrder/WordOrder.html

    Have a great day

    April 16, 2015

    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/sandeepa2

    Please have a look at my favourite resources posted on another thread: https://www.duolingo.com/comment/7368660 . Danke

    April 17, 2015

    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/OneAndOnlyJosh

    Wow, Thanks! I especially like the dartmouth link for Modal Verbs.

    April 17, 2015

    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/sandeepa2

    Bitte schon. Happy learning.!

    April 17, 2015

    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Yototas

    German word order:

    The most comprehensive German grammar book for English speakers, including word order, is the famous "Hammer's German Grammar and Usage".

    April 16, 2015

    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/OneAndOnlyJosh

    Thank you for the resources! I would probably be in the beginner category.

    April 16, 2015

    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Bernie1629

    I found the Deutsch fur euch syntax playlist on YouTube excellent for getting a good understanding on word order: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Ddvhtelb4OY&list=PLDl7JofqmDnE11FmtCfbiOBc4tJ9Ewlue I took notes from the videos, then used sites such as the dartmouth.edu one FreedomWind has linked to already to expand on particular areas.

    April 17, 2015

    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/FrankMank87

    Thanks for your sharing

    April 21, 2015

    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/FrankMank87

    The second quote is very intriguing indeed!

    So, if I cought the right sense of Holmes' words, in german they are used to put the direct object in first position, then the subject and lastly the verb?

    April 17, 2015

    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/sakasiru

    Sorry, but that sentence is NOT how a German would word this. The verb is always in second position, so whoever made up this joke didn't even speak proper German and is in no way entitled to mock the language ;)

    April 21, 2015

    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/OneAndOnlyJosh

    I don't know, that is why I asked for resources for German Word Order.

    April 17, 2015

    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Laruthell

    To be really proper German word order it would have to be "This account of you have we from all quarters received" (So that the main verb is second.) But what Holmes is probably referring to is just the "received" on the end. German is well known for leaving the verbs till the end of the sentence, even though it is not "all" the verbs, in fact, but only the participles, verb complements, etc. The Dartmouth link FreedomWind shared is excellent, and will explain this all perfectly.

    April 17, 2015
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