"Thógamaranmadranuaabhaile."

Translation:We took the new dog home.

3 years ago

13 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/moloughl
moloughl
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This seems like an English construct translated directly into Irish. In Irish one would say "We brought the new dog home with us".

Thugamar an madra nua abhaile linn.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/KaramataBG
KaramataBG
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I think your suggestion is more natural in English, too, not just in Irish.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mjkuecker1965

Aww :)

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/annmcaff
annmcaff
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Why is the accent so 'english' sounding ? Should 'nua' not be pronounced ' noo-a' rather than 'new-a'

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/galaxyrocker

Why? Because the speaker isn't a native speaker and often makes many mistakes.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MadlyCeltic84

There ought to be more readily available dialectical samples "here is Ulster, here is Connacht, here is Munster" or something of the sort for those who wish to learn the language in painfully specific detail

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/galaxyrocker

I think the important thing is to first get a competent speaker. Then worry about dialects.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MadlyCeltic84

I wholeheartedly agree (but as someone merely starting with the language, I couldn't rightfully comment on such things). surely there must be a wealth of untapped knowledge amongst the public. I would assume, with what little I know of the pride associated with Gaeilge in Ireland, there must be plenty of native speakers who would be happy to pass it on

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/John365571

No sound

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/LeeInCalif
LeeInCalif
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Since "tóg" can mean "build" or "take," and "thógamar" can mean "we built" or "we took," shouldn't it be correct to translate this sentence as "we built the dog a new home?"

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SatharnPHL

No, because the adjective nua is qualifying the noun madra it means "new dog".

The English sentence "we built the dog a new home" is a bit tricky, because "the dog" isn't the object of the sentence, "a new home" is the object, and the Irish would be:
Thógamar baile nua don mhadra

I think in many cases Rinneamar teach nua don mhadra would be preferred, because it avoids any ambiguity in tóg, as a dog's house is often portable, and teach would be preferred even for a home for a person. While abhaile and sa bhaile are translated as "homewards" and "at home", baile on it's own is more likely to be interpreted as "town".

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/LeeInCalif
LeeInCalif
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Thanks! I very much appreciate your thoughtful response! As you'll see from below, I didn't fully read the whole sentence — not really grasping the word order, OR the use of abhaile vs. teach! DOH! (BTW, your suggestion of using rinneamar to avoid the ambiguity of tóg is great!, too)

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/LeeInCalif
LeeInCalif
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Never mind! I had not sufficiently focused on the word order of the second half of the sentence.

1 month ago
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