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"You have taken the photos to your house."

Translation:Usted ha llevado las fotos a su casa.

3 years ago

32 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/Rochelle74165

Could "tomado" be used instead of "llevado" in this sentence?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Talca
Talca
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No, and I am very glad that you asked this. tomar una foto = to photograph, or, in the English idiom "to take a picture." But the Spanish verb llevar means to carry in the sense of "to take something/someone someplace." Como: ?Llevas los vasos a la cocina? (Can you take the glasses to the kitchen?) So, there is a difference. Hope I explained it clearly.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/hippietrail
hippietrail
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Are you a native Spanish speaker. It's possible for a language to have both an idiomatic and literal meaning for the same phrase. In English "take a photo" is an example. Idiomatically you're snapping a picture but that doesn't prevent you from using "take" to pick up a photo from the shelf and take it to your room.

My Spanish isn't good enough to know if both work OK in Spanish so I'd only trust the advice of a native speaker.

6 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/PamelaDurk

why is it not tu casa? su means his, her etc.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/biertopf

It's su, because usted, i.e. the formal "you", is used. You could also translate the English sentence with informal you = tú, the the possessive is tu: has llevado las fotos a tu casa.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/PuntoH
PuntoH
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You're right, "su" means "his", "her", "its", and "their", but it also can also mean "your" (as in this case). All of these are called "possesive adjectives", by the way.

Here are some examples of the usage of "su" and "tu", the possessive adjectives that you are having troubles with:

Tu (2nd person, singular, informal) = Your

  • Tu perro es inteligente ---------- Your dog is smart.

  • El perro de tu amigo es feo ----- The dog of your friend is ugly.

Su (2nd person, singular, formal) = Your

  • Su hijo es muy inteligente, señor Molina.

  • Perdón, profesor, pero debo decir que su hija es muy linda.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Marie282520

Well, that is a curve ball if I ever saw one...because we seldom use Usted and ustedes....I wish you would explain a bit more on this topic. "Su" is for all persons but first persons singular and plural, and second singular informal? All that?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/RyagonIV
RyagonIV
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Yes. Have a brief list of possessive adjectives:

  • yo -> mi, mis
  • tú, vos -> tu, tus
  • nosotros/as -> nuestro, nuestra, nuestros, nuestras
  • vosotros/as -> vuestro, vuestra, vuestros, vuestras
  • él, ella, usted, ellos, ellas, ustedes -> su, sus

Usted and ustedes pretty generally use 3rd-person grammar: the same conjugational forms and many of the pronouns as él, ella, ellos, and ellas do.

9 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/hippietrail
hippietrail
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I disagree. "Usted" and "Ustedes" are used all the time in Mexico where I learned Spanish. That's how you speak respectfully to your elders and superiors and people your meeting formally or for the first time. It may well vary a lot from country to country though.

6 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/moomoo0516

Why is vosotros not an answer? I know it is only used in Spain, and I thought it was another way of saying "You." Why is it wrong?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/rogercchristie
rogercchristie
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I don't think moomoo0516 meant a specific sentence.

"Vosotros habéis llevado las fotos a vuestra casa" is a good translation and certainly should be accepted.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/CassieMcNaney

It's almost right, but they used to word "pieces" instead of "photo"

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/zhaskin

Could this not literally be interpreted as you have taken photos, as in "has sacado fotos" instead?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/biertopf

Not in connection with "to your house". If it said "of your house", then yes.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/alejandrocarmo

usted ha tomado las fotos a su casa,,,

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/tessbee
tessbee
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Hello, Alejandro. I know your a native speaker, so if I may ask, is it really correct to say "tomar la foto" in this sense (taking/transporting/carrying the photo somewhere)? I've read somewhere that "tomar la foto" is "to take the picture of/to photograph [something]". Was what I read wrong? Thanks so much!

7 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/cquieroaprender

"han llevado las fotografías a tu casa" - what's wrong with this?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/biertopf

It should be su casa, if you use the 3rd person pl. in the first part of the sentence -> [Ustedes] han llevado las fotografías a su casa.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/territech
territech
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You is second person, formal or informal, singular or plural. So the possible translations for the English pronoun "You" are "Usted", "tú," "Ustedes," "Vosotros" (in Spain only)." The verb forms of haber for these pronouns are ha, has, han, habéis. It is logical that if you translate "You" to plural formal (Ustedes) then your possessive pronoun should also be formal. I believe the following are all valid:

Usted ha llevado..su casa; Tú has llevado...tu casa; Ustedes han llevado...su casa; Vosotros habeís llevado...vuestra casa

Por favor, corrígeme si escribo mal.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/tripwalks

Is vuestra a word? Or it is made up? would the corresponding word for vosotros be su?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/territech
territech
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Yes it is a word. Here is link to Spanish Word Reference. http://www.wordreference.com/definicion/vuestro

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/del537547

the present perfect congugates 'you have' as "has" not "ha" so why is 'ha' used?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/rogercchristie
rogercchristie
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tú has llevado = you have taken (singular familiar)
usted (abbreviated to Ud.) ha llevado = you have taken (singular formal)
vosotros habéis llevado = you have taken (plural familiar - only in Spain)
ustedes (abbreviated to Uds.) han llevado = you have taken (plural always used in Spanish America, plural formal in Spain)

"tú" and "vosotros" are optional and only included for emphasis.
We would usually say "usted" because "ha" can also mean "he/she has".
We would usually say "ustedes" because "han" can also mean "they have".

However, if it is clear that we mean "you", we can also leave out the "usted" or "ustedes". For example, my boss is looking for some photos in the office. I might say "Discúlpeme señor, ha llevado las fotos a su casa."

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Marie282520

Once again those 833 days allow you to be generous.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/rogercchristie
rogercchristie
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I like to help, but also the questions prompt me to review and revise my own understanding, so thanks for asking.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/RobChristiansen

see the change here? - [Usted ha] but [Tú has]

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/alexdduo

Technically, the one ending in sala could be used, because by taking it to your living room, you are taking it to your house probably. Why isn't that shown as an answer?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/biertopf

But it's not the translation of "house", so: it's not a correct answer. If you want to say "living room/sala", say "living room/sala", not "house/casa".

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Brandon756

Is the other answer. "se han vivido las fotos a su casa" Even correct spanish?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/RyagonIV
RyagonIV
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No, if only for the fact that vivir is almost completely intransitive. :)

9 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Esaias29

this is stupid i word it differently and get it wrong ITS THE SAME THING

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/biertopf

What did you write? And what's wrong WITH YOUR CAPS LOCK KEY?

2 years ago