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  5. "They do not like water."

"They do not like water."

Translation:Sie mögen kein Wasser.

December 21, 2012

154 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Mcgurker

It's a cased language, let us place the words in whatever order we like as beginners, dangit. OR make it clear where things are supposed to go. Don't be so floppy.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ncmycelium

I think that this system allows us to place things in whatever order we like so that they can tell us clearly where things are supposed to go.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/keith39

but they don't tell us why


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AlexWolffe

The tips & notes section always explains the grammer on the desktop version of the site.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/2GreyCats

Tips and Notes are in mobile apps too now.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JeffreyFosgate

AMEN! Have three Lingots for this!

I get very frustrated when the order of things change. In fact, one of the only things I struggle with still, besides the genders of certain nouns, is sentence structure because from what I recall, it was never made clear how the structure of ANY sentence is. Is it like Spanish where nouns and adjectives, among other things, are swapped, or is it like English, or something else entirely? I just don't know, because I've never been told anything of the sort besides through the comments of more informed people.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Erin878130

From a previous German class: the Verb is usually second position in every sentence. The major exception is if it is dative or there is a dative preposition in the sentence, then the verb moves to the end of the sentence. Subordinate clauses do some word order switches too


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mizinamo

The major exception is if it is dative or there is a dative preposition in the sentence, then the verb moves to the end of the sentence.

Excuse me?

Do you have an example?

Ich helfe dir has a dative pronoun dir but the verb is in the second position.

Ich sitze an einem Tisch has a dative preposition an but the verb is in the second position.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/KLEOROD

No but thats not correct


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RachelHe8

It is grammerd like that, i tryed a lot of times. Duo, make it clear where it goes. Or it will be very confusing to beginners like us. Please not to flop the words, duo. It could be better if duo let us put the letters in the order that sounds right to us.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/TrevorQuip

yeah but if it doesnt follow german rules then it would only make sense to you and not people who are fluent in german... so it will make you seem evdn more of a foreigner and it will confuse more people... so just learn the sentence structure from the get go... it is really simple...


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mette547406

Yeah but the sentence could be accepted and then corrected? Like if someone's just started learning a language and the structure's never taught it can be pretty hard to just figure it out, especially if the specific sentence hasn't been used earlier


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/2GreyCats

The structure is taught.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/bhomik77

Sie mögen nicht Wasser. Is it not correct? When exactly is kein used and when nicht?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MIKERD

Nicht is for verbs and Kein for nouns. Becareful kein must be declinated for each of the 4 cases. Nicht goes after the verb and kein before the noun.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/NF6FxQcs

Nicht does not always go after the verb, at least not right after it. Here it would be "sie mögen Wasser nicht". By the way, could anyone explain why it seems better here to say "sie mögen kein Wasser"? To me it sounds like, "OK, they have tried and tried, but no matter where it comes from, there is no drop of water that they like"...


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/K0oLKAt67

I thinks its because "ich mögen Wasser nicht" means that they just don't like water in general while the other one means that they haven't enjoyed any water they've tried so far.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Bonnie958351

If I understand you correctly:

1) Sie mögen nicht Wasser.

2) Sie mögen kein Wasser.

Both of these sound better than the correct answer I was provided:

Wasser mögen sie nicht.

Can you explain that ear sore of a sentence? It sounds like Yoda.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/arthaey

In addition to what mikerd said, here's way more than we need to know as beginners about the placement of the word "nicht" ;)

http://german.about.com/od/grammar/a/The-Position-Of-Nicht.htm


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Boxeye

I remember it as "nicht" is like not. "Kein" is like none.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ms.curly

be careful Kein is not always none. e.g. I drink water not oil: Ich trinke Wasser kein Öl.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Murad195780

kein with Names nicht with Verbs Sie mögen kein Wasser


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/J4j88

You also use kein when a word has an indefinite article (ein, eine, einen).


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JanjaFlis

Kein is used for nouns and nicht is used for verbs.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Essylt

nicht should always be in the end of sentence


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/zoewilson2011

Nicht should not always be at the end of the sentence. It can be, but it goes BEFORE prepositions and possessive phrases.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Anonimo13

I wrote Sie moegen Wasser nicht, and it said it's correct. Can I trust it? Or should I prefer the other syntax?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/beckalina

Yeah that should be fine. I think the reasons they showed us the other one are a) to show us how flexible the sentence structure is, b) so that 'sie' would be in the middle of the sentence so we could tell if it's they or you (not capitalised so they)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/J4j88

You are completely allowed to flip the subject and object around. Just make sure you have the correct case when adding articles


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Boxeye

I'm not an expert but it sounds right to me when I say it.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Sunnysmiley

The reason it is not right is because you need an umlaut over the o


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AgenTsi

"Oe" is an acceptable way to express "ö." Likewise, ae = ä and ue = ü.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/EdTyrone

"ss" can be used for "ß", too.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/arcra

I found this explanation to be a little bit more clarifying... http://german.about.com/od/grammar/a/German-Negation.htm ... according to this, the reason why "kein" is used in this case is because the noun has no article.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Nicolas443059

Why is "Sie mögen nicht Wasser" wrong?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/CherylnotWang

I think in this case the nicht would go after the Wasser because nicht goes at the end of the sentence except for prepositions and possessives


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/EdgarKHXZ7

is this sentence the same as "Sie mögen kein Wasser"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mizinamo

Sort of.

The emphasis is a bit different.

Wasser mögen sie nicht puts Wasser first, so that's the topic you're talking about. "As for water: they don't like it."

Sie mögen kein Wasser is a more neutral sentence and merely says that "they don't like water". It doesn't particular emphasise any part of the sentence.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/meagan.wood

I still dont understand why its not kein in both cases. Isnt it still refering to nouns in both cases?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mizinamo

Sort of, but it's not right before the noun in both cases.

A more literal translation (with archaic English grammar) might be "Water like they not" and "They like no water".

You can't say "Water like they no" -- "no" has to go before a noun.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Robbadob

Kein Wasser mögen sie? Is the verb not in the second position here?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mizinamo

The verb is in the second position there, but putting a negative at the beginning is very odd -- you can't really topicalise the non-existence of something.

"I'll tell you something about 'no water' -- it's what they like." ???


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/EdTyrone

But, in this example, "They do not like water" is the English translation. So, wouldn't Sie mögen kein Wasser be the closer German phrase to this translation? (The literal translation would be something like, "They like no water.")

And, wouldn't Water they do not like be a closer translation of Wasser mögen sie nicht? (The literal translation would be something like, "Water is liked by them not".)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mizinamo

But, in this example, "They do not like water" is the English translation. So, wouldn't Sie mögen kein Wasser be the closer German phrase to this translation?

Yes, that would be closer to the English phrase -- it's the most neutral word order.

It's an artefact of how translation exercises are created on this course.

Sentences start out as German and get a list of English translations.

One or a small number of those English translations get marked as "best" -- that one (or one of them) will appear at the top of the discussion page (on the website version), will be used as the correct answer in "pick the correct translation" exercises, will be used to create tiles for tapping exercises, etc.

And such a "best" translation is used to create the reverse (English to German) exercise, and the original German sentence has to be the (or a) "best" translation.

And thus because Wasser mögen sie nicht. was used as the original German (presumably to provide some variety and get learners used to seeing things other than the subject at the beginning), it has to be marked as the best translation of the English.

Sie mögen kein Wasser is also accepted. (And I think I'll add it to the list of "best" translations now -- and try to move it to the beginning.)

Wasser mögen sie nicht? (The literal translation would be something like, "Water is liked by them not".)

Eh? The literal translation would be "Water like they not."

If you want a translation that captures the topicalisation, then perhaps "As for water: they don't like that" or "It's water that they don't like" or "They don't like water" could work, depending on context.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/kibernick

so, no "das" Wasser?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/wcdickson

"I don't like water" versus "I don't like the water". Those are different connotations in English just as they do in German. The former would be water in general, while the latter is a specific set of water (perhaps the water available in a specific city).


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/calypso15

I really don't understand why "Sie mögen nicht Wasser." is incorrect. When are you considered to be negating the noun vs. the verb? Because I think of this as "They (do not like) water", not "They like (not water)".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AwkwardScarecrow

Pretty sure, as mentioned above, the verb-comes-second(after the noun) rule. And sie capitalized would be she. So sie should be after Wasser, which is the noun. If that makes any sense. :P


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/calypso15

I don't think that's right. "Sie" (capitalized) is "you (formal)". I entered "Sie mögen nicht Wasser" and it marked it wrong and said the right answer was "Sie mögen Wasser nicht". Hence my original question.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AgenTsi

I may very well be wrong, but my understanding is that "nicht" is at the end of the sentence because "Sie mögen Wasser nicht" is a declarative sentence (http://german.about.com/od/grammar/a/The-Position-Of-Nicht.htm). Even then, it isn't good German because the sentence should be "Sie mögen kein Wasser" instead (http://duolingo.com/#!/comment/58648).

If it helps, think of "nicht" as a movable element (or sentence block - I prefer colored lego bricks) that changes where it is depending on the rest of the sentence. Though "nicht" is usually found after the verb, it is by no means static.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/TikoPiko

Sorry for probably asking a silly question, but "Sie mögen kein Wasser" seems okay to me. Tell me why I am in the wrong! :)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Zaphy3

Was ist der Unterschied zwischen 'gern haben' und 'mögen'? Ich habe "Sie haben Wasser nicht gern" getippt.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mizinamo

gern haben is more affectionate - you'd usually gern haben a person, or maybe a teddy bear, but not an action or an inanimate object that you don't have "warm, fuzzy" feelings for.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/iche123456

Why not " Sie mögen kein Wasser"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RobMeyer

They said "Wasser sie mögen nicht." is wrong. Is that because of the verb-in-second-place rule?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MarkSpott

Think, Sie mörgen Wasser nicht...is correct. At least it was marked correctly. Wasser sie mögen nicht...sounds more like a question of surprise than a statement.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mizinamo

Wasser sie mögen nicht is simply wrong. It's neither a question nor a statement nor a command nor anything else. It's not a valid German sentence and has no meaning.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ayla.alex

Why do you not put "Das" in front of 'Wasser'?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Glutexo

Because it means water in general, not one specific water. It is the same as water vs. the water in English.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/maro613716

Why ( sie mögen nicht wasser ) is wrong ? Isn't the same meaning !?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mizinamo

No. That would be "They like not water" -- which feels like only half a sentence, e.g. "They like not water but wine" (Sie mögen nicht Wasser, sondern Wein).


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Skye148706

What's wrong with 'Sie mögen nicht Wasser'? The verb is in second position and isn't nicht usually after the verb and not the noun in a case like this?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/rozieland

Sie mögen Wasser nicht was accepted as correct. Can both phrases be right?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mizinamo

Yes.

I would recommend Sie mögen kein Wasser, though.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/dahotmessenger

thanks Mikerd and Arthaey. that was helpful!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Melissamillerrr

Why does it translate literally to "water like they not" ? what is the grammar structure for a german sentence?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/wcdickson

"Verb second" is pretty much the only rule you have to follow most of the time. As long as nouns (and their articles) are in the proper case, you can put subjects, direct objects, and indirect objects wherever you please.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/arthaey

The grammar structure is "water(accusative) like they(nominative) not". Word order varies between languages; use a "literal" translation only to help you understand its meaning.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Gelomyrtol

It's really hard to remember the different grammar of German in this case...


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Yen978128

What is the difference between mag and mögen here? Or eveb gern they all mean like right?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mizinamo

mag and mögen are different forms of the same verb -- you have to choose the right verb form depending on the subject.

ich mag and sie mag (she likes) but wir mögen and sie mögen (they like), for example.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/luzreimann

Mag= I and you singular . Mogen= they and you plural


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mizinamo

That is not correct.

du mag is wrong.

mogen is not a word.

ihr (you plural) does not take mogen or the correct spelling mögen.

  • ich mag
  • du magst
  • er, sie, es mag
  • wir mögen
  • ihr mögt
  • sie, Sie mögen

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/gresty2013

Can you not say "Wasser gefällt ihnen nicht"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mizinamo

Sort of. It would sound kind of weird with Wasser (in general) as a subject, though.

gefallen is more about looks or other such external stimuli.

So you might say Das Wasser im Restaurant gefällt ihnen nicht "They don't like the water in the restaurant" (perhaps because it is cloudy, or smells funny, or has a bitter aftertaste).

But Wasser in general? It seems a bit of an unlikely subject to me.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/aradhya808114

Do order really matter?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/az_p
Mod

    Order course of matters word!


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Becca-girl

    I am a german speaker And I think that if Duo Let us put the words in your own order tgan you would not kearn the correct sentence so it would not work like that .people should also exept that we don't always have to be right because next time you will remember


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Becca-girl

    The correct is sie mogen wasser nicht I speak german


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/lowe71871

    Warum ist nicht ”Sie mag Wasser nicht„ richtig?


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mizinamo

    sie mag means "she likes"

    sie mögen means "they like"

    The verb has to match the subject.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Hotz196498

    putting together the V2 rule and the rule that nicht goes before nouns that have definite article or possessive pronouns, we see that mögen is position 2 for verb=2 and nicht should NOT go before Wasser for lack of definite article (its just water in general not 'the' or 'your' or 'her' etc water)... we have mögennicht ) from there not sure what rules govern which order but its enough to get started.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mizinamo

    the rule that nicht goes before nouns that have definite article or possessive pronouns

    Eh? That doesn't sound like a good "rule" to me.

    Ich mag das Buch nicht. would be the best word order for "I don't like the book", and similarly for Ich mag dein Buch nicht.

    Ich mag nicht das Buch or Ich mag nicht dein Buch sound to me like "It's not the book that I like, ..." and "It's not your book that I like, ..." -- incomplete and waiting for a second part to the sentence telling what it actually is that you do like.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Hotz196498

    im just repeating precisely what is written in the duo lesson "not" tips and hints, which introduces "nicht." read it for yourself, these are not MY "rules." (the tips and hints are accessible thru the html site, not the app) of course there are going to be exceptions to every rule, its language not algebra, just like we can split hairs over the semantics of "guidelines" versus "rules." there are going to be several types of sentence constructions, the "guidelines" of which will be applicable depending on whichever is being used. This is apart of the nicht sentence type duo chose to present first, and I am going to trust that these rules are applicable until duo elaborates with ancillary conditions, constructions, and exceptions. im going to be objective as to what sounds right, and focus on what duo tells me IS right. cause if the two were in sync, we wouldn't be here.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mizinamo

    Hm, so I see. That works all right for "to be" sentences, but are not very useful guidelines in general.

    We'll have to see whether we can improve the wording there.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Hotz196498

    that was supposed to be (blank) mo:gen (blank) nicht. stupid duo deleted my underscores. again with the needless formatting/editing duo! that completely ruined the clarity/helpfulness of my comment. sorry all.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/amyjuliarose

    why is it not sie nicht mögen wasser?


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mizinamo
    • you did not capitalise the noun Wasser
    • the verb mögen is not in the second position in the sentence -- you put both sie and nicht in front of it

    It could be Sie mögen kein Wasser, Wasser mögen sie nicht, or possibly Sie mögen Wasser nicht (though if you put sie first, then kein Wasser sounds better to me).


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/CakeMixer

    "sie moegen Wasser nicht" was also marked as correct, but since water is a noun, shouldn't it be "sie moegen kein Wasser"? Or is it nicht because it refers to the verb? I was taught kein for Nouns and nicht for verbs....


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mizinamo

    Sie mögen kein Wasser is fine and probably preferable to Sie mögen Wasser nicht (which, as you say, would tend to negate the verb, i.e. saying that their relationship with water is not best described with the verb "like").


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ErdnaGoogle

    Why start with the complement? I already saw german sentences starting with an adverb, but not with a complement as WASSER.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mizinamo

    German can front quite a number of elements, especially to topicalise them -- Wasser mögen sie nicht might be translated hyper-literally as "As for water: they don't like it": a topic–comment sentence which introduces the topic ("water") and then comments on that topic ("they don't like it").


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LazaDeutsch

    What about if I put them in the basic SVO format? Should it becomes "sie mogen Wasser nicht." or "sie mogen nicht Wasser"


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mizinamo

    The best SVO version, I would say, is Sie mögen kein Wasser.

    (Also, there is no German word mogen as far as I know. If you can't spell mögen, then write moegen.)


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/aesuarez

    I dont understand why "Sie mögen nicht Wasser" is wrong. Not only the order of the subject and direct object, but also because nicht can be taken as modifying the verb instead of the whole sentence without losing any meaning


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mizinamo

    If nicht is modifying the verb, it would be Sie mögen Wasser nicht.

    Sie mögen nicht Wasser would negate Wasser -- "It's not water that they like [but rather ...]". And without a "but rather ...", the sentence seems as if half of the thought is missing.

    Sie mögen nicht Wasser, sondern Saft "It's not water that they like, but rather juice" would work, for example. (Or "They don't like water, but instead juice." etc.)


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Kat45606

    Sie mögen nicht wasser


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mizinamo

    That is not a correct translation.

    Wasser has to be capitalised, but even if you corrected that, see the thread started by aesuarez for why it's not a correct translation.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ShafaqP

    "Wasser mögen sie nicht" is so confusing...for me, it meant "water doesnt like them" instead of "they don't like water"


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Anja410157

    Wasser moegen sie nicht/ Sie moegen nicht Wasser are both the correcr answers


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mizinamo

    Wasser mögen sie nicht / Sie mögen kein Wasser would be good answers.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mugwumpman

    Is there a different phrase for "they don't LIKE water" vs "they don't WANT water" and if so what would it be?

    The same goes for "I like water" vs "I would like water". The first is expressing that you generally enjoy water and the second is asking for it.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mizinamo

    Is there a different phrase for "they don't LIKE water" vs "they don't WANT water" and if so what would it be?

    They don't like water = Sie mögen kein Wasser.

    They don't want water = Sie wollen kein Wasser. / Sie möchten kein Wasser.

    I like water = Ich mag Wasser.

    I would like water = Ich möchte (gern) Wasser.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DavidS.May

    Noun doesnt go first here


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Minni_Mii

    this is so worng...it should be: Sie mögen kein Wasser.


    [deactivated user]

      It's weird that "Sie mögen wasser nicht" correct.


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/shaybah.de

      Mein Satz "Wasser gefällt ihnen nicht." wurde nicht akzeptiert. Warum denn?


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/eraime

      That is not correct


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mizinamo

      What is not correct? Which sentence are you referring to, what is wrong with it, and what would be the correct version?


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/j9925231045

      sie mögen keine wasser should be right


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mizinamo

      Why do you think so?

      Wasser is a noun, and has to be capitalised.

      It's also a neuter noun, so keine is not the right form.


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/congerat

      Why "sie mögen nicht Wasser" is wrong?


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/alpilerntdeutsch

      So if we can use ''nicht'' in this sentence, it is not an obligation to use ''kein'' when we negate words like ''water'' which has no article?


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LaynePierc1

      WHY NOT? sIE HABEN WASSER NICHT GERN?


      [deactivated user]

        Mine says "Wasser mögen sie nicht"


        https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SimoneStud1

        I don't think it matters if you say Die mögen kein wasser vs Sie mögen kein wasser


        https://www.duolingo.com/profile/EdTyrone

        I don't know the nuances of German, but I think, "Die mögen kein Wasser" means something like "The (maybe "It") doesn't like water."
        You are replacing sie (they) with "die" (the). But, I'm just learning, too, so as far as I know, it's is possible. But, that's my logic on this, anyway.


        https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mastawal

        Would "Wasser mögen sie kein" work or is german sentance structure less flexible with negations?


        https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mizinamo

        Would "Wasser mögen sie kein" work

        No.

        If at all, it would have to be Wasser mögen sie keins with a pronoun at the end, rather than an article (which has to come before a noun). Having an article alone by itself would be a bit like "I saw the door but I didn't open the". But keins doesn't really work here, either, and even if it did, it would be something like "They don't like any water", i.e. they don't like any kind of water, rather than "they don't like water".


        https://www.duolingo.com/profile/amirjdk

        What's wrong with "Sie mögen das wasser nicht"?


        https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mizinamo

        There is no German word wasser, and das Wasser with a capital W means "the water", not simply "water".


        https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mycerealromance

        I put "Sie willen nicht Wasser". Means the same thing but it wasn't accepted


        https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mizinamo

        I put "Sie willen nicht Wasser".

        sie willen is not correct German.

        Also, before an indefinite noun such as "water", use kein rather than nicht -- otherwise it seems that the sentence is unfinished, as if you had said "What they want is not water" (which leaves you waiting for the "..., but instead ...").


        https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ErdnaGoogle

        Why cant it be "Sie mögen Wasser nicht"?


        https://www.duolingo.com/profile/talia-89

        Because you are negating the noun "Wasser". When negating, kein/en/e is used for nouns (like water) and nicht is used for verbs.

        Example:

        They do not like water = Sie mögen kein Wasser They do not swim = Sie schwimmen nicht.


        https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Hao192075

        why "Sie mögen das Wasser nicht" not correct?


        https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mizinamo

        why "Sie mögen das Wasser nicht" not correct?

        Because that would mean "They do not like the water", but here you are asked to translate "They do not like water".


        https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Hao192075

        Thanks. Then is "Sie mögen Wasser nicht" correct?


        https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mizinamo

        is "Sie mögen Wasser nicht" correct?

        It's not completely wrong, but for an indefinite noun such as Wasser, using kein to do the negation is better: Sie mögen kein Wasser.


        https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Bonnie958351

        Wasser mögen sie nicht.

        How do you explain that? It sounds like Yoda talking.


        https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Jaggerto

        Wasser mögen sie nicht. The arrangements reminds me of sign language. Doesn't need to be complete as long the main thoughts are in there.


        https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Niidea

        Can we write "Ich mag wasser nicht" ??


        https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Anonimo13

        No, that would be translated as "I don't like water"


        https://www.duolingo.com/profile/someone23

        wasn't "sie Wasser mögen nicht" an other way to write it?


        https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Anonimo13

        Keep in mind that verbs must always (unless on secondary sentences or questions) be on the second place. So either "Sie mögen Wasser nicht" or "Wasser mögen sie nicht", notice how the verb is on the second place.


        https://www.duolingo.com/profile/someone23

        ohh ok, didn't know that, thanks =)


        https://www.duolingo.com/profile/vltesq

        That is a major piece of information you've provided us! Thanks!


        https://www.duolingo.com/profile/bjurv

        sie magst nicht das Wasser, isnt that correct?


        https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Anonimo13

        No, "magst" it's used for the second person (singular) you. With the third person (plural) you get to use "mögen". And you shouldn't add the article "das" since it's not written, I believe it's not referred to a specific water, but to water in general.


        https://www.duolingo.com/profile/luzreimann

        Thank you. That make sense


        https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Sul4v

        Why not..'Sie keinen mogen wasser.'?


        https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mizinamo

        Because:

        • Wasser is a noun and has to be capitalised
        • mogen should be spelled mögen with an umlaut (or moegen if you can't type the umlaut)
        • Wasser is neuter, but keinen is masculine accusative -- the correct neuter accusative form would be kein
        • kein has to be before Wasser, not separated from it by the verb (it would be like saying "They do not any like water" rather than "They do not like any water" -- "any water" would have to stay together)

        https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AI2L3

        Why in german language in duolingo is without tips while french language has tips in duolingo?.the french now is easier than german according to me maybe because there is tips in french


        https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mizinamo

        There have been tips and notes in the German course for a long time.

        However, they are only available on the web version, not in apps -- and even in the web version, they are "hidden" since the introduction of the "Crowns" feature.

        To access the tips and notes for a unit, click on the lightbulb in the little window that opens when you have selected a unit:

        Tips have been introduced to mobile courses in only a couple of courses for now -- you would have to ask Duolingo staff why they picked those first, but they don't read these sentence discussions as far as I know. Hopefully, if they make good experiences with them, they will be rolled out to all courses eventually.

        For now, I recommend that you visit the website https://www.duolingo.com/ before you start a new lesson unit and read the tips and notes there.


        https://www.duolingo.com/profile/lixnhua

        kein means any, and it can not be used exactly like 'not', it can not define a verb.


        https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mizinamo

        kein means any

        No. kein means "not a" or "not any".


        https://www.duolingo.com/profile/lixnhua

        "Sie mögen kein Wasser" means "They like any water".. i hope you understand wtf is wrong


        https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mizinamo

        "Sie mögen kein Wasser" means "They like any water".

        No. It means "they do not like any water" or "they do not like water".


        https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Stefan9098

        Sie mögen nicht Wasser

        Is a way better translation and more correct. A german wouldn't say it the other way


        https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mizinamo

        Sie mögen nicht Wasser sounds unnatural to me in German.

        Sie mögen kein Wasser would be better if you want to start the sentence with sie.

        If you want to use nicht, then Wasser mögen sie nicht would be better, or maybe Sie mögen Wasser nicht, but not Sie mögen nicht Wasser.


        https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ErdnaGoogle

        Totally wrong. Before noun you use KEIN

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