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"Is é mo laoch é."

Translation:He is my hero.

3 years ago

17 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/Stephen_87
Stephen_87
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...mo ghile mear.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Cullen45967
Cullen45967
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Came here to say this haha thanks

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/GaelBeal
GaelBeal
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Why the pronoun reduplication?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/scilling
scilling
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In this sentence, the first é is called the subpredicate, and the second é is the subject “he”. The subpredicate is required because the copula is not allowed to be adjacent to a definite predicate.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Buachaill1

Go raibh maith agat! That clarifies several sentences I've encountered on Duolingo.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/GaelBeal
GaelBeal
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It was the second one I was wondering about. As galaxyrocker points out below, in the second person you would simply say "Is tú/tusa mo laoch", not *"Is tú mo laoch thú".

When I came across this, I assumed it was simply a stylistic choice, analogous to "tóg go bog é" and "tóg é go bog é", both of which I have come across (though I admit only the first sounds correct to me).

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/scilling
scilling
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Copular identification statements with third-person pronouns have different structures than those with first- or second-person pronouns.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/khmanuel
khmanuel
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How would you say "you are my hero"? Is tu mo laoch thu?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/galaxyrocker

Just Is tú mo laoch or, perhaps more common, Is tusa mo laoch (and loach gets lenited in speech, but not in writing)

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/GaelBeal
GaelBeal
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An l with a séimhiú? How is that pronounced?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/galaxyrocker

It's [l] in the Celticist transcription (as opposed to [L] unlenited). In some dialects there's a four way distinction with broad/slender and lenited/unlenited.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/PookaGar
PookaGar
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You're twisting my melon, man.

Which dialects, out of curiosity? (And I seem to remember something similar about [r] as well, but maybe I'm just making that up in my memory...)

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/galaxyrocker

It's <n>, actually. <r> no longer lenites in the dialects, afaik

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/PookaGar
PookaGar
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Ah, that was it. A quick Wiki'ing says that there was a fortis/lenis broad/slender four-way distinction for L, N, and R in Old Irish, which may be what I was thinking of... I guess that has variously collapsed in the dialects.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Buachaill1

Is one é for emphasis here or are both grammatically necessary?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/scilling
scilling
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The latter; see my first reply to GaelBeal above.

3 years ago