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"Il a une clé."

Translation:He has a key.

3 years ago

23 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/Immyx

sounds a lot like "il est une cle"

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Sitesurf
Sitesurf
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"il est une clé" is not correct French: you would need "c'est une clé"

In addition, you would hear the T liaison between "est" and "une"

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/RScC61
RScC61
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Is une clef just another variant? is it more or less common that une clé?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Sitesurf
Sitesurf
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"clef" is the old spelling. Both spellings are still in use, but "clé" is more frequent.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/i5UjfN4y

Wondered what happened to 'clef' - it was what I was taught when I was in high school some 50 years ago. Still used in music though as in 'G clef' - key signature.

11 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/pete3466
pete3466
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Why isn't 'spanner' acceptable?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Suchiththa

I'm hearing a weird thing at the end of une - it sounds like oonuh. IS that happening correctly? This is the male voice

10 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Sitesurf
Sitesurf
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It is a schwa, and the sound is 'uh'.

Please take a look at this: https://frenchcrazy.com/2013/04/the-french-schwa.html/

10 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Suchiththa

Aha! I've never thought that French has such a prominent Schwa! I'm an actor, so I've learned enough Linguistics for accent work.

So, is this a regional thing then? I feel like the female voice never does it. And would it be something ridiculed in Paris? Or is it an accepted sound? Also, curious, would this be common in Quebec, or not? (I live in Canada, so it's relevant here)

10 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Sitesurf
Sitesurf
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You can hear the schwa in poetry (to suit the required number of feet), in songs, when people enunciate clearly, and in the southwest of France.

Parisians usually don't take the time to enunciate clearly, hence their swallowing some sounds, and the frequent pronunciation of otherwise mute -e's is interpreted as "an accent". But in reverse, Parisians are said to have "un accent pointu" (clipped).

As far as I know, schwas don't seem to be common in Quebec.

10 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Suchiththa

Do you mean number of beats? Or is that a French-ism, to call every beat/syllable in poetry 'feet'?

It's interesting that a clipped Parisian accent leads to a dropping of Schwa's because in Britain, the RP accent, which is more clipped, has more Schwa's (although, admittedly, they are in the middle of words, converting more open vowels to it. Interesting stuff :)

9 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Sitesurf
Sitesurf
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In versified poetry, a syllable is a foot.

An alexandrine is a 12-foot verse:

"Pour qui sont ces serpents qui sifflent sur nos têtes ?" (*) has 12 feet, including the second syllable of "sifflent", that you have to pronounce as "see-fluh".

(*) lit. For whom are these snakes whistling above our heads? (11 feet in English).

9 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Suchiththa

Ah right. I don't know if in English anyone uses that term, but then again, I learned English in a 3rd world country (I used to also write verse and poetry in general) - so maybe it is used. I should ask my wife. She is British and actually studied English language and Literature for her A Levels. Maybe I'll post back with the answer.

9 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Sitesurf
Sitesurf
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Yes, please.

9 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Suchiththa

Yep, confirmed it with my wife, the English do not use the term feet/steps/any foot analogy for syllables in poetry. They primarily use the word syllable, but if they had to beat it out would use beats (especially with something like a Sonnet).

9 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Sitesurf
Sitesurf
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Please take a look at this page and scroll down to "7."

https://www.collinsdictionary.com/dictionary/english/foot

9 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Suchiththa

Man, and I just learned something new :) Thanks Sitesurf, you are truly awesome!

https://www.quora.com/What-is-a-foot-in-poetry-and-what-are-some-examples

https://www.quora.com/What-are-examples-of-foot-in-poetry

https://www.poetryfoundation.org/learn/glossary-terms/foot

This is more commonly found it formal poetry, but regardless, I'm ashamed to call myself a poet and be unaware of it. I finally know why the iambic pentameter is called that!

Now to go teach my wife about this!

9 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Sitesurf
Sitesurf
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Ah ah, we can all subscribe to the famous saying, "the more I learn, the more I realize how little I know".

Cheers!

9 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/RefreshedRain

my answer is "it is a key", says it's wrong and the answer says it's "it's a key". Why is my answer wrong?

9 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Sitesurf
Sitesurf
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Il a = he/it has

You cannot replace "has" by "'s" when "has" means "possesses", only when "has" is an auxiliary followed by a past participle.

9 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SuzanneMcE

that's what i said

6 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Todd26

"It is a key" is should be accepted. "It's a key" is literally the same as "It is a key".

6 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Sitesurf
Sitesurf
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Please take a good look at the French sentence: Il a une clé.

This is the verb "avoir" = to have/possess.

6 months ago