"Tá an t-ollmhargadh ag déanamh brabúis."

Translation:The supermarket is making a profit.

3 years ago

8 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/khmanuel
khmanuel
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Is it brabus or brabuis?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/galaxyrocker

brabúis. The direct object of the verbal noun in the progressive is (generally) in the genitive.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/teeling2
teeling2
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galaxyrocker, would you please explain the "uis" instead of just the "us " in this word. When later in the lesson they asked to translate "profit", I spelled "brabuis" and it was marked incorrect. So, as usual, I'm confused again!

11 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SatharnPHL

The ag + verbal-noun construction (ag déanamh in this case) causes the following noun to be in the genitive, and brabúis is the genitive form of brabús.

11 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Joshua807325

I'm hearing something like "Tá an t-ollmhargadh idir na brabúis"

8 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Niall_bg
Niall_bg
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N for nn l

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SeanMeaneyPL
SeanMeaneyPL
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ag déanamh sounds like [idjinna] here, with the stress on the initial i. I really could not pull out "ag déanamh" after numerous tries. Is this how it is pronounced in some parts of the country, or by some speakers?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SatharnPHL

It's an example of "cup of tea" syndrome.

English speakers often elide the "f" in "of" in normal speech. In Irish, the "g" in "ag" and the "n" in "an" are often elided too. There is no hard and fast rule - just as the "f" in "of" is sometimes spoken, and sometimes not (even by the same speaker), depending on the cadence of a particular sentence, or the formality of the setting, and it doesn't cause a problem for other English speakers, because we subconsciously "hear" the "f", even when it isn't there, the elision of "ag" and "an" is just part of the normal rhythm - sometimes they will be articulated, sometimes they won't. In a sentence like this, an Irish speaker "hears" "ag déanamh", just as an English speaker "hears" "cup of tea", even when the speaker elides the "f".

1 year ago
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