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"C'erano pochi studenti che rimanevano in classe."

Translation:There were few students that remained in class.

April 20, 2015

18 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/tonidapillipi

Can't it also be 'a few' students?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ellenkeyne

I said "There were a few students who remained in class" and got dinged :/


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RichardWil528737

Fine - but how would you say "a few" (as distinct from "few") in Italian?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/beardan76

I put 'There were a few students that would remain in class' but got Basiled by Duolingo


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Paul380307

The proper English pronoun for one or animate beings is 'who.' 'That' is appropriate to inanimate things. Duolingo flubbed this one.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/yraYO3ID

No, not really. The relative pronoun 'that'is perfectly acceptable for people unless you're in a very formal setting.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DJGVtc
  • 1372

There were few students WHO remained in class, surely? Or were the students not human?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/1951K

In english when referring to people "who" is used instead of "that"...


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RichardWil528737

Probably in idiomatic British English, you'd say "Few students remained in the class", avoiding the need for either "that" or "who".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mjkw

in class is not corr3ctvenglish


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mjkw

one could say « there were very few students » or « a few students » but NOT there were few students


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ChrissieRe2

The difference between 'a few' and 'few' here is that the former means some - maybe a handful, whist the latter means hardly any


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RachelleMC676282

For translation reference: this should read "there were few students who remained in class'


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jonathan618111

Correct English could be, "there were (a) few students that had remained in class' ...but is this Italian imperfect ? Dinged...


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AliNikkhah1

Why is "There were a few students who would remain in class" wrong? As in "we always left as soon as the bell rang, but there were a few students who would remain in class"; saying "..., but there were a few students who remained in class" doesn't fit quite rightly. This is all assuming imperfect in Italian means imperfect.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RichardWil528737

I think it's because "pochi" means "few" - meaning really not many at all (ie emphasising the negative implication of few); whereas "a few" (positive emphasis) would normally be "qualche" or "alcuni".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Antti605855

Why is 'remained in classroom' wrong when 'classe' means both 'class' & 'classroom'?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RichardWil528737

If you quoted your exact words, then it's because a definite article is needed in English for this sort of construction: "remained in the classroom". (Of course, I can't guarantee, DL being what it is, that you'll be marked correct if you try this.)

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