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"Are you looking forward to you traveling to Germany?"

Translation:Glæder du dig til at I rejser til Tyskland?

April 21, 2015

27 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/WendyMcGee1

You are imposing Danish sentence structure on an English sentence; we would say, 'are you looking forward to travelling to Germany?' (We would not use 'you' again.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ChristianM499674

Why can't it be "glæder du dig til DU rejser til Tyskland"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RidderJakob

It is correct to use 'du'


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/TheCormorant

This is REALLY awkward English. We'd likely say something more like: Are you looking forward to you trip to Germany. Or: Are you looking forward to your Germany trip?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/dagummace

Weird switching from thou to you mid-sentence!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Xneb

They could be asking one person whether they're looking forward to a family trip to German.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/TSCorbett

Nonetheless the sentence is unnatural in english


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/GigiGottwald

But how are we to know that?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ItsTyrrellYo

this sentence hurts my head


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Kristian1kiki

Can somebody explain to me why this sequence of words? My translation would be "Glæder du at rejser til Tyskland?"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ycUvuSap

"at glæde sig" is reflexive, so you need "Glæder du dig" or similar structure in plural.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/sll-ttt

He asks the kid if he is eager to go to germany with his parents. The kid is du ( He is the one happy) but he doesn't travel alone ( The family is the I)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/HonestX

"Ser du frem til at du rejser til Tyskland" should be correct.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/YvonneJanssen

why is it first du (singular) and later in the same sentence I (plural)? also why is 'ser du frem til' not accepted?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Debra974221

Can you say: Glæder du dig til at rejse til Tyskland? Doesn't get the idea of you traveling, but is it a correct sentence?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/GigiGottwald

Debra, I think your question is valid, and I wish someone would answer it. I wrote the same, because I feel the "you travelling" is surely understood: 'Are you looking forward to travelling ...' If someone else would do the travelling, you'd have to say "Are you looking forward to ...'s (e.g. your friend's) travelling ...", and that would be a bit of a weird sentence, badly in need of context!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MathiusGudsgave

I hate this sentence.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Debra974221

Agree with WendyMcGee1. No English native speaker would ever say this. We would say "Are you looking forward to travelling to Germany?"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/James22Cook

Glæder du dig til rejsen til Tyskland ?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Hinni79

Really bad English!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/meedeegeegee

travel (one l) / travelling (two l)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/duodb

In US English, anyway, traveling (one l) is preferred, though both are correct. https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/traveling


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/miaash1

Glaeder du dig til at du rejer til Tyskland? is correct. Glaeder du dig til at I rejer til Tyskland? is incorrect. Du stays as du Du must not change to I in the middle of this sentence.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DieLegende2

Well it can if they refer to different (groups of) people. I'd imagine this as asking a kid ('du') if he/she's looking forward to a journey with the family ('I')


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Helene666293

miaash1, i think you are right. duo's solution is definitely incorrect.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DragonNights

DieLegende2 is correct. This is a question asked to a single individual about a group's travel. Hence the shift from "du" to "I".

But the versions using "I" +"I" or "du" + "du" are accepted alternatives.

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