"Does it rain Saturday?"

Translation:Regent het zaterdag?

3 years ago

11 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/pablo.mell2
pablo.mell2
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Why is there not a "op" here?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Gelaarsd_Schaap

To me, a native Dutch speaker, "op zaterdag regent het" suggests that it rains on any saturday, while "zaterdag regent het" suggests that next saturday it will rain.

However I guess that there is no 'op' in the given translation because there is no 'on' in the given sentence.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/CyrilofAlabama

This makes sense. So to express that it rains on any given Saturday, you would most naturally say 'Op zaterdag regent het' and not something else like 'Op zaterdagen regent het'?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Andres.Campe
Andres.Campe
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This sentence came up in an excercise, it was in english and i had to translate it to nederlands. I'm not a native english speaker, so i can't really tell, but "does it rain Saturday?" sounds a little weird for me. Wouldn't "does it rain ON Saturday" be better? or maybe "will it rain on saturday?" if it is not yet Saturday... (if it is Saturday i'd rather say "today", except for the sake of this excercise)

It seems pretty obvious here in this excersice that in nederland they do not use the on-preposition "op", but that should not affect the sentence in English.

What do english natives speakers say? wouldn't it be better to say "ON saturday"? Should i report it?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AStudyInRose
AStudyInRose
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Either works! Will it snow Tuesday? Will it snow ON Tuesday? Or even, Will it snow THIS Tuesday? I usually use the "on" option, but any of these are correct! (Native speaker of Canadian English)

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MihirBhagat

What's wrong with 'Doet het regent zaterdag?'

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Susande
Susande
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In Dutch you turn a statement into a question by changing word order, not by adding an auxiliary verb like in English.

  • het regent = it rains
  • regent het? = does it rain?
2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Cian8656
Cian8656
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Why is it "Regent het" instead of "Regen het"? Why is the 't' not dropped like in some other scenarios? For example: "Jij hebt" vs "Heb jij?"

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/El2theK
El2theK
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That rule only applies to the inversion of je/jij.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Cian8656
Cian8656
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Ah ok, thanks for the quick response. Is dropping the 't' for je/jij inversions fairly consistent then? And just to make sure I understand, would it be "Hebt zij?" then?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/El2theK
El2theK
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It would be Heeft zij, since it's zij heeft

  • Je/Jij hebt - Heb je/jij?
  • U hebt/heeft - Hebt/Heeft u?

Another way to look at is, is that you use the conjugation of ik when there is a je/jij conjugation.

  • Ik ga - Ga ik? - Ik lees - Lees ik?
  • Jij gaat - Ga jij? - Jij leest - Lees jij?
  • U gaat - Gaat u? - U leest - Leest u?
  • Hij gaat - Gaat hij? Zij leest - Leest zij?
1 year ago
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