https://www.duolingo.com/skiffie

'A esos jugadores se les espera...'

skiffie
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I've been reading sports articles on marca.com to get some understanding practice and just came across this:

"A esos jugadores se les espera en partidos como el del miércoles, han nacido para ellos, han sido fichados para ellos."

So I understand the sentence, but I am confused about how the first section is put together, specifically "a esos jugadores se les espera..."

  1. Is this the 'reflexive' se or the 'passive' se?
  2. If reflexive, it would imply the verb is esperarse (to expect), i.e. 'these players are expected to...'
  3. If passive, it would imply the verb is esperar (to hope) with no subject (se espera, i.e. it is hoped that... X), i.e. 'it is hoped that these players...'
  4. I assume it cannot be the 'impersonal' se ('no se fume') since that construction takes intransitive verbs only, and clearly esperar (or esperarse) has objects in this construction.

if anyone can help me break this down it would be awesome :)

Thanks everyone!!!

3 years ago

6 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/Elizabeth261736

Someone else will have to explain the fine details of the grammar, but perhaps it's poetic expression? The sentence has a beautiful rhythm. The author may be playing with the double meaning expect/hope as well as the sounds of the words.

Does esperarse always mean to expect? I seem to remember hearing esperame and esperate when someone wanted me to wait and slow down.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/skiffie
skiffie
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It does have a beautiful rhythm doesn't it :) I assume esperame would be 'wait for me', and 'esperate' 'slow yourself down'? I think the first would be a direct object construction, but the second would be reflexive...

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Ilmarien
Ilmarien
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I think it means "These players are expected in games like Wednesday's," i.e., we want the players we spent this much money on to be around when it matters. One thing I've noticed with Spanish from Spain is that sometimes they really like making things reflexive - I've seen "se me olvida" instead of "olvido," for example. You will come across tons of fun colloquialisms reading those soccer papers.

As far as the direct object thing goes, my guess is that what you're seeing there is something called leísmo - it's common in Spain to use "le" instead of "lo" when the direct object is a male person.

Anyway, good luck if you're for Madrid. Please blow up in La Liga if you're for Atlético, haha.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/skiffie
skiffie
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Yeah, that was the meaning I took from the sentence, I was just trying to figure out exactly what the construction is - it's very different to say 'these players are expected' vs 'it's expected that these players'... etc.

I remember reading that re leismo! But in this case it's 'les' - does it also apply to the plural?

All for Madrid! haha. Fingers crossed. I'm amazed you're wishing me good luck though, usually everyone hates RMA...

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Ilmarien
Ilmarien
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Haha, Madrid would get Valencia right between the two semifinal legs. It is in my best interests that you're as tired and distracted for that as possible. :D But I don't hate Madrid, really.

And yeah, I'm pretty sure it would apply to the plural as well.

I see strange constructions in those newspapers pretty often, though, so beware. It's sometimes hard to figure out which ones are common usage, what are slang, what's just terrible Spanish, etc.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/skiffie
skiffie
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So I just realized that it can't be a DO because they're using the prepositional phrase, 'a esos jugadores'. Well, unless that's a personal 'a'. Hard to tell... take this with a grain of salt, but Google Translate handles 'les' just fine but blows up on 'los', so I'm not sure.

Haha, I wish I liked a smaller team like Valencia or Sevilla, but it was not to be!

3 years ago
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