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"Tá rís aici."

Translation:She has rice.

3 years ago

30 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/edenfoxe

Does anyone know of a good pronunciation guide? I understand it's hard to get audio for every recording with a human voice, but it does make it harder to learn a new word, and I have not yet heard a recording for "aici".

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jpslb418
jpslb418
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I thought that to say "she has..." you say: Sí rís agat. If someone could help me, that would be great. Thanks!

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/galaxyrocker

So, in Irish, you don't 'have' something; rather, it's 'at' you.

  • agam - at me
  • agat - at you
  • aige - at him
  • aici - at her
  • againn - at us
  • agaibh - at y'all
  • acu - at them.

Note: Those are standard spellings; dialectal forms will vary.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jpslb418
jpslb418
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Thank you very much for the help!!!

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Hannah615860

Thankyou! I need a cheat sheet of these froms!

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/scilling
scilling
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Sí rís agat literally translates as “She rice at-you”. Tá rís aici literally translates as “Is rice at-her”; in English word order, that would be “Rice is at her”, which is the Irish idiom for “She has rice”.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Ciara368196

No Sí rís agat is she ate rice

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Sushinese
Sushinese
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I didn't know that Irish likes(loves?) rice so much! If rice is their main food, they and I(Japanese) would be friends :)

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Endercheez

why does it say she has twice? PLS HEEEEEELP

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/IrishSelkie

you could google it

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Eissen1
Eissen1
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Is ag a preposition in Irish or a verb?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/galaxyrocker

It's a preposition. Like English, Irish often combines prepositions with verbs to change the meaning. In this case ag is combined with the verb ( is a form of that) to mean 'have'. Literally, in Irish, you don't 'have' something, but rather something is 'at you'.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ShalRose7

'She's rice' is not the correct answer. Its far from the same as 'she has rice.'

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/galaxyrocker

Unfortunately, DL can't distinguish between places where 'has' can be contracted and places where it can't, so it's considered correct if contracted all the time.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/chuckledragon65

I am very confused as to knowing which subject ta is referring to without using the hints. Can anyone help?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/galaxyrocker

Generally it's referring to whatever comes directly after it. The issue with this sentence is that the subject of the Irish sentence (rís) is the object of the English sentence. Thankfully, this only happens when prepositions are involved, so look for those.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/chuckledragon65

Ris is the object though, not the subject. What I'm trying to say is that Duolingo does not accept He or It as the subject, only Her. Is there a way to tell which it is meaning, or is Duolingo wrong in leading me to believe that this sentence can only be used for She has rice. ?

10 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/KevinM.207

Duo isn't wrong here, "aici" == "ag" + "sí"

Therefore the only correct translations is "She has rice" (literally, "Rice is at her").

Technically I suppose "It has rice" should be accepted too in the case where the "it" is feminine.

10 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JrgenZirak
JrgenZirak
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As pointed out before "ris" is the subject in the Irish construction "Rice is at her", it becomes the object in the translated idiom "Shd has rice".

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Szabx

I am confused. In another sentence, aici is pronounced eh-key(or similar) and here is eh-keh. Are these two pronunciations interchangeable?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/galaxyrocker

Dialectal. Speaking South Connemara Irish, I would say the latter, but I know the former is said in some places.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SantiagoMo84735

The answer is wrong, it should be her rice

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/galaxyrocker

'Her rice' would be a rís (which could also be 'his rice' and 'their rice', depending on context)

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AdaHayes

it says that the translation is she has got rice and i know that translations can get a little wonky but this is really bad grammar.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DavidColem2

Is "she has the rice" wrong here?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/KevinM.207

Yes, that would be incorrect. The definite article "an" would be necessary for your translation to be correct: "Tá an rís aici."

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Eimear392150

Aici should be pronounced 'ah-key'

6 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/shelli839325

Its annoying how her pronuciation of aici keeps changing ;-;

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Ciara368196

Can someone tell me what Tá rís aici

2 years ago