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"Zij is naar Amsterdam gereden."

Translation:She has driven to Amsterdam.

0
3 years ago

13 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/PatHargan
PatHargan
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Why is it 'is' and not 'heeft'?

4
Reply2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/azevedof
azevedof
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Because the verb 'rijden' (is...gereden) in this case is pointing to a specific direction (Amsterdam), so 'rijden' must be preceded by a conjugation of 'zijn'.

'Ik ben met de auto naar Antwerpen gereden.' (I have driven to Antwerp by car)

'Ze is met de motor naar Frankrijk gereden' (She has ridden to France on a motorbike)

When not pointing a specific direction, 'rijden' should be preceded by a conjugation of 'hebben'.

'Ik heb de hele dag in die auto gereden' (I have driven in that car all day)

'Hij heeft nog nooit met een motor gereden' (He has never ridden a motorbike)

Check this for more info: http://www.dutchgrammar.com/en/?n=Verbs.Au04a

9
Reply2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/PatHargan
PatHargan
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Thank you.

0
Reply2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/kobajagiprinceza

Why not "She has ridden to Amsterdam."? http://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/ride

3
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Gelaarsd_Schaap

I guess it has to do with 'rijden' being a kind of movement, or even a kind of state. Could some Dutch speakers please try to come up with a counterexample for this idea?

If my neighbour had brought me to Amsterdam by car, I could say "hij heeft me naar Amsterdam gereden". However in this case it is also common to say "hij heeft me [met de auto] naar Amsterdam gebracht" ~ "he has brought me to Amsterdam [by car]".

2
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/kobajagiprinceza

And what if she rode on a bus (likely) or on a horse like Lady Godiva (unlikely)? What do the cowboys in the westerns do? Do they "rijden naar de stad"?

1
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Gelaarsd_Schaap

In Dutch only the bus driver drives the bus. All the passengers are said to take the bus, or to 'go with the bus': "Ik ga met de bus naar Amsterdam" ~ "I take te bus to Amsterdam" / "I have taken the bus to Amsterdam".
Sometimes I actually do say "Ik rijd met de bus door Utrecht." In this case I am on a bus that is driving through Utrecht.

Cowboys ride their horses: "Cowboys rijden op paarden".

4
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/kobajagiprinceza

So unless the means of transportation is mentioned, it's a given that you were driving a car. Got it. Thanks.

1
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Gelaarsd_Schaap

Many Dutch people regularly use the train. They are also sometimes said to have 'gereden' to their destination.

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3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/PrinsesKayla

Is "she drove to Amsterdam" correct, or would this be a different verb tense we would need to use?

1
Reply2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MentalPinball
MentalPinball
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Hi Kayla,

Your sentence is in the Simple Past tense, which is used with specified past time reference (you need an adverb/adverb phrase referring to the padt, su h as yesterday, two days ago, etc.).

When the time reference is vague or there's no time reference, we use the Present Perfect. Note that we also use this tense with since and for to indicate 'duration'.

0
Reply11 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ibeardsell

Why does the spelling change to an "e" for gereden; that is, why isn't it gerijden?

1
Reply2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MentalPinball
MentalPinball
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Because rijden is an irregular verb, I think.

1
Reply11 months ago