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  5. "As batatas são baratas."

"As batatas são baratas."

Translation:The potatoes are cheap.

September 15, 2013

21 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/sevy694

This is a really fun sentence to say over and over.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Carapauzinho

O pão é bom mas a broa é boa.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Danmoller

Common word for "cheap" (adjective) (barato, barata, baratos, baratas).

And for cockroachs!!! (a barata)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Balamcat

So As baratas são baratas could mean "the cockroaches are cheap"? I love Portuguese


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Danmoller

Yep. :)

Or "the cheap ones are cockroaches" :p


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DREDWARD

Obrigado,Dan :)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Hector290697

Huh, you could pun with that. XD


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/pbez

Could it be possible not to mention the article 'the'?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/djeidot

It would change the meaning. If you said "Potatoes are cheap" (or the equivalent in Portuguese, "Batatas são baratas") you would be generalizing, i.e., saying that all the potatoes in the world are cheap.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/OsoGegenHest

Are you saying that Portuguese is the only Romance language in which articles are not used for generalisations? I'm surprised.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ZuMako8_Momo

It would depend on context. Generally, «As batatas são baratas.» means a specific group of potatoes, and «Batatas são baratas.» is in general or all potatoes are cheap. That is the difference when contrasting these two sentences, per se. However, in comparisons, you can still use the article and have it be a generalization:

-Comprei umas cenouras hoje! Custaram-me 5 euros por quilo. -Possas! As cenouras estão caras. (I used «estão» here because the price may change next week, for example.) -Pois estão! E as batatas também.

Another example of a generalization with the article: «O elefante é o único mamífero que não consegue saltar.».


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PabloStanfield

I disagree: in English (Good English not a literal translation is the object) the few cases in which you might say the potatoes require such specific context [e.g.: the potatoes on this menu…] that one wouldn't not leave it out...


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JCMcGee

Can I ask, Is this used in European Portuguese as well?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JoymiMelenciano

Batata only means potatoes or does it mean the batata we know in spanish


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/djeidot

What other meaning of batata exists in spanish???


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Coayuco

In Spanish, "batata" means both sweet potato and yam. There are regions where "batata" is used for potato, but generally "potato" in Spanish is "papa" in Latin America or "patata" in Spain.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ZuMako8_Momo

«batata doce» = "sweet potato" «(o) inhame» = "yam" I don't believe the distinction between these two is made distinct quite often.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Sinval17

Batata is potato in Brasil. Inhame is diferent. Inhame is other "tubérculo".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/rudjer

As baratas são baratas. (The cockroaches are cheap.)

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