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"Het meisje leest over motors."

Translation:The girl reads about motors.

0
3 years ago

16 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/PaulineStinson
PaulineStinson
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Words ending in -or can have two different plural forms: https://onzetaal.nl/taaladvies/advies/sponsors-sponsoren. So, "Het meisje leest over motoren" is also correct.

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Reply2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/dkpwatson

In Dutch, can the word "motor" refer like in English as a slang word for car? For example, "John's got a new motor."

5
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Susande
Susande
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No, it can mean engine or motorcycle.

6
Reply2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/FritzGraven

Machine and motorfiets is less confusing to me.

0
Reply10 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Susande
Susande
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Sure, you can use those, but others will definitely also use motor for both.

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Reply10 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/FritzGraven

Dat is waar, ik denken uit een Afrikaanse perspectief, which is often English strangely enough. Like motorfiets from motorcycle or kar from car. Het Nederlands is echter een meer interessante taal, als Afrikaans of English.

1
Reply10 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Notenhals
Notenhals
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Megan Fox is fixing Bumblebee

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Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ilmolleggi
ilmolleggi
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Ik heb van hetzelfde gedacht ;)

1
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DankeMemez

Up until this point I've assumed that meisje refers only to female children, but this sentence makes me wonder if it can also be a more casual term for an adult or adolescent woman (like 'girl' in English.) Is this true?

2
Reply2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Susande
Susande
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Yes that's right.

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Reply2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/erwandiar

can "motors" be defined as "engines"? thanks

2
Reply2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/El2theK
El2theK
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Yes, it can have that meaning.

5
Reply12 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/huth3
huth3
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Question to native english-speakers: do'nt you distinguish between "engine" and "motor" where engine is a combustion engine (fuel or diesel) and motor is an electric motor? Thanks in advance.

3
Reply2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Alphathon

Engine does indeed usually refer to an internal combustion engine, but it doesn't have to. (Another example would be a steam engine.) Motor also usually refers to an electric motor. However, technically motor would be correct for a car's engine, hence the term "motorcar".

Technically I think motors have to produce some kind of mechanical motion, which is why the drives of fictional starships are called engines (warp engines, impulse engines) rather than motors (since their movement isn't mechanical).

In most real world uses however the distinction is purely that of fuel (petrol/gas, diesel, coal… ) vs not.

6
Reply1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/adamskj
adamskj
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In general, yes. As Alphathon noted, 'engine' and 'motor' are used for combustion engines in cars and trucks, but 'engine' rarely refers to an electric motor. (Also, 'motor' is rarely used for the engines in ships, large aircraft, or train locomotives but is used for motorcycles, lawn mowers, and small aircraft; there's a size component to whether or not it's used as an alternative to 'engine'.)

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Reply6 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/NCThom
NCThom
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I'll sign off on all of what Alphathon and adamskj wrote. And I'll add that the retractable sunroof in my car has a motor in it, but not an engine. We also have search engines, siege engines (back to ancient Rome and the Middle Ages, including ballistae, mechanized battering rams, towers, catapults, and trebuchets), and several engines (without physically moving parts) in computer science. And none of those is a motor.

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Reply1 week ago