"Stadann an bus dearg ar an mbóthar."

Translation:The red bus stops on the road.

3 years ago

8 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/mjkuecker1965

I wanted an bus glas. :)

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/kjsoda
kjsoda
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How does "bothar" differ from "sraid?" The online dictionary that I referenced says that "bothar" is road "sraid" is street, but I would generally consider a road and a street to be the same thing.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/galaxyrocker

I would consider "road" as being slightly smaller than a "street". Or more rural (think back roads v. side streets).

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AnLonDubhBeag

Like galaxyrocker's answer:

Cosán: Any kind of path

Bealach: Can be clearer than a Cosán, and wider.

Bóthar: A rural road, wider again than a Bealach.

Sráid: A road/pathway in a town.

A forest pathway would qualify as a Cosán. A cleared pathway, distinct as a path, is a Bealach. Bóthar is essentially at the level that cars can freely pass in both directions.

Even in English in Ireland a "street" is a purely urban/town thing. I would never call a country road a "street". Perhaps this is different in other English dialects.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/John365571

A person can walk down the street while a bus drives down the road. If you don't know the difference you should not be allowed out without your parents.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Onyx.Rose
Onyx.Rose
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If that's the case, no one in the US belongs outside without their parents. Both the bus and a person can be on the street...it's just one's on the pavement and the other's on the sidewalk. That was still funny anyway.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SatharnPHL

Outside the US, the pavement is a synonym for what you call the sidewalk - indeed, in parts of the US, pavement is a synonym for sidewalk ("to pound the pavement" implies walking the streets, not driving a vehicle). Footpaths/sidewalks in towns and cities were "paved" long before roadways were.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Onyx.Rose
Onyx.Rose
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I remember the term. It always seemed to be a Chicago or New York City term to me, since it was spoken a lot about in the media but not in real life.

1 year ago
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