https://www.duolingo.com/thediscoverer

how about nicknames/titles when you level up.

Won't it be great to move from a starter to a native. We can start from something like "novice learner" to end up as a "native speaker" with dozens in the middle. It will work like a title which could be used with pride inside the site. Won't that be great!

September 17, 2013

13 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/Samsta

You can't become a native speaker from Duolingo. I'm a native speaker of English because it's the language I grew up with.

September 17, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/Kai_E.

Uh, Samsta's absolutely right here. A native speaker can only only ever be someone who grew up speaking the language from birth. A more appropriate title for the end would be fluent. It would be entirely to confusing to label not-native speakers as native speakers because users might look to the "native speakers" for help, only to find out that they only have advanced knowledge of the language.

September 17, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/Preusser

Even fluent is questionable as it implies CEFR C1 or C2 -- improbable achievements with Duolingo alone.

September 17, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/Kai_E.

Indeed, 1710 words in German for example is far too small for a fluent speaker's vocabulary, and there are many other aspects of languages that aren't covered in these lessons. But for what it is, Duolingo is fantastic.

September 17, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/thediscoverer

I mentioned those names as examples. What you fellows are telling is true, but my point was some kind of nick names but not the definition of "native speaker" or possibility of being fluent solely depending on this site.

September 17, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/christian

I think the levels work just fine.

September 17, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/thediscoverer

yup! they are pretty good! :)

September 17, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/Dessamator

I disagree. Levels are pretty much meaningless. See my discussion here: http://www.duolingo.com/comment/837212

I think at best with duolingo we may be able to become intermediary. Mastery of a language is dependent on 4 skills (write, speak, read, and listen) or combinations thereof. Duolingo tests 3 of these abilities reasonably. However, the ability to speak is not being tested properly, and is entirely optional.

So anyway, assuming duolingo taught those 3 skills perfectly. It would still only be 3/4 = 75% of the skills required, and that would only happen if you learn it perfectly.

The levels should in my opinion be reworked, a level cap should be put until you pass a number of modules with a test.

September 18, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/christian

I'm well aware that the levels we have are not a good indicator of how well you know a language. However, they do represent, to a certain degree, the amount of work you've done on Duolingo and they're not as misleading as titles like "native speaker". No-one is claiming that you'll be fluent or magically turn into a native speaker once you've reached level 25.

September 18, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/Dessamator

I agree. Titles would be worse, if not chosen correctly.

September 18, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/Preusser

Precisely! Thank you Christian!

September 18, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/Jibrah

nope, Levels don't really mean much. I am a higher level than many people who are farther along in the tree than I am, because I do new lessons less often, instead I do immersion translations and practice old words, which gives me lots of coins and allows me to level up without learning much new material

September 19, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/Singemonkey

I think this is a good suggestion. As others have argued, they'd need to be careful not to use misleading titles though. And maybe that's the problem. Anything meaningful to language learning might imply a degree of language functionality that isn't really implied by the level. But if they come up with just fun titles like fake military titles or something, that might be good.

September 18, 2013
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