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  5. "I got sunburn yesterday on t…

"I got sunburn yesterday on the beach."

Translation:Fuair mé griandó inné ar an trá.

April 27, 2015

12 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Fransfrench

Coming from California, I've been sunburned many times, or gotten sunburned, or had a sunburn, but I've never heard "I got sunburn."


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SatharnPHL
Mod
  • 1452

Sunburn is a "condition". English is very inconsistent about how it handles "conditions" - some require a definite article (I got the measles), some require an indefinite article (I got a cold), some don't take any article (I got frostbite). Just as "frostbite" can also be "frostbitten", "sunburn" can also be "sunburnt"/"sunburned".

In Ireland, "I got sunburn" would be a common construction. "Bhí mé griandóite"/"I was sunburnt" would also be commonly used.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Tadhg620375

No, not really. No one says, "I got sunburn". It is either "I got a sunburn" or "I got sunburned". Please correct this. Thanks.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SatharnPHL
Mod
  • 1452

I'm happy to correct you. This no one, and many other Irish people, do say "I got sunburn".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/fionanichio

"dó gréine" should also be accepted


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MacCionnaith

The synthetic verb form "fuaireas" should be accepted.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/TArdy44

I put "ag an trá", which seemed more natural. I know the sentence was "on the beach", but shouldn't my translation be accepted?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Knocksedan

ag an trá is "at the beach". ar an trá is "on the beach".

Unless you know for a fact that nobody ever says ar an trá in Irish, then there really isn't any reason to translate "on the beach" as anything but ar an trá.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/FeargalMcGovern

Another sentence involving someone being sunburned uses "faigheann". I suppose both are correct?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/scilling

Since faigheann is present tense, it wouldn’t make sense with inné.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/alexinIreland

I think you are thinking of the sentence "Faigheann sé griandó gach samhradh" which refers to a present habitual action :)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/FeargalMcGovern

Go raibh maith agat, your right, I don't believe I didn't notice that! :P

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