"Duo artık işsiz!"

Translation:Duo is now unemployed!

3 years ago

18 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/geometry
geometry
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Why is it that Duo can't seem to hold down a job lately? With all the languages he speaks, I would expect him to have a great resume.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/BABELTOWER12

Unfortunately, reality can be surprising. Allow me to challenge this. You would be surprised sometimes… I could compete with Duo in term of number of languages and yet… I am about to loose my job as a translator polyglot after 11 years of work.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/lisa4duolingo
lisa4duolingo
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Though facing a job loss is usually never welcomed, I hope this just opens an even better door for you down the road someday. And keep in mind, some really successful people in life have lost their jobs (and more than once!). I don't want to go much further into this topic because it strays a bit from educational purposes of learning grammatical structures and word etymology, but I think it would make for a really terrific general duolingo post.

I think such a post, written for duolingo users in general (not just those learning Turkish) would be extremely beneficial and generate a lot of good discussion. Especially if this is an actual trend, across the world, and what some think the reasons for it are and what the future might bring. Your years of experience in your line of work would make you a perfect candidate for starting such a discussion.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/edubongo

I'm still a bit confused about when to use "artık" and "şimdi". Could someone clarify, please?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/orde90
orde90
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Artık = from now on, anymore, any longer (refers to a short or long-term change)
Şimdi = now (refers to this moment)
Şu anda or Şu an = at the moment (refers to this moment too! but it actually refers to the actions/situations that have already started and still continue)

So I guess all of them could work for the english translation Duo is now unemployed.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/edubongo

Thanks heaps!

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/pilotjones1991

Could you use şimdi here without changing the meaning? If not, what meaning does 'Duo şimdi işsiz' have?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/orde90
orde90
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Yes you can. There is no difference in the meaning.

Duo şimdi/artık işsiz = Duo is now unemployed.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/BABELTOWER12

I don't understand why it's not "Duo is no longer unemployed"

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DottyEyes

According to my Turkish-English dictionary, the translation "no longer" works only with negative verb. So I'm guessing that a sentence like "I don't run anymore" would translate to "Artık koşmam," where simple present for "I run" is "koşarım" (I run) and simple present negative is "koşmam" (I don't run). Can an expert comment on this and tell me if I'm right?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/michielvoo

I'm am not an expert :-)

Google translate has these translations:

  • ben artık koşuyor: I'm running now
  • ben artık koşmuyor: I'm not running anymore

This confirms the information you found in your dictionary, namely that the meaning of "artık" changes from "now" when used in a 'positive' sentence to "anymore" when used in a 'negative' sentence (in English it combines with the negative particle to "not anymore").

Here's another example, this time using "değil" to make the second sentence 'negative':

  • artık mutlu: happy now
  • artık mutlu değil: not happy anymore
8 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/lucaturilli

Just something, they are supposed to be 'koşuyorum' and 'koşmuyorum'. Other than that very good explanation.

7 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/EmptyNestExpat

I wrote 'Duo is no longer unemployed.' Why is that wrong?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/lucaturilli

Your sentence means that Duo used to be unemployed but he is not now. But given sentence means Duo used to have a job but it doesn't have now.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SheikhJahb
SheikhJahb
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Ha ha, I forgot how to translate this, so I translated the last word as "without work", so the translation I gave was, "Duo isn't working anymore." Still, I wonder why it's wrong.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AlexinNotTurkey
AlexinNotTurkey
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That is different in Turkish (just like it is in English). "Duo artık çalışmıyor."

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SheikhJahb
SheikhJahb
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Thanks bro, you're a real blessing. This smartphone game is a lot more fun with people to explain the hard parts.

If I could ask a follow up question, I was told that Turkish didn't use prefixes. So how is işsiz, işli, and işçi related to çalış?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Yomalyn
Yomalyn
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I don't think çal is a pre-fix. But the words are related (maybe originally as a compound?). According to Nisan Sözlük (all in Turkish, sorry!) "çalmak" has pretty violent connotations ("hit, beat", etc). It is used also with instruments- you hit the keys of a piano, beat a drum, etc. (which is why Google translate will also offer the translation "play"- as in: drum playing = "davul çaliyor")

This dictionary links this to "çalışmak", which came to mean "expend energy or effort on a task" (i.e. "work"). I guess it would take a lot of energy to beat something :-)

However, I'm not fluent (yet!), so I'm open to corrections if I'm misinterpreting that page.

1 month ago
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