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"Yo nunca había llegado tarde a la escuela antes."

Translation:I had never arrived late to school before.

September 17, 2013

81 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Pigslew

Didn't accept "I'd never come late to school before". Reported.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Synesthete24

Ugh. Now it required that and not "I never had arrived late to school before" (admittedly also "clunky," but it should still be accepted). Sometimes it seems like Duo has a very narrow base for what's accepted.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/admcfad

Same mistake. Getting a little frustrating, seems there are a lot more picky translations now than there used to be. I don't like when you have to figure out the specific translation duolingo is looking for, as opposed to any acceptable translation.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/doggiehx

Same. Duo does that sometimes. Reported


[deactivated user]

    Clunky, but OK. Imo, this is better :-

    • I had never before arrived late to school.

    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/el-Canguro

    same ..... DUO does not speak English, it seems!


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JustinTunl

    Keep tripping over the difference between being late 'for' as opposed to 'to'. Is there a difference in English? As a 50 year old Brit I find 'for' sounds more natural.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/klgdarwin11

    As a 50 year old American, I typed "for" as well. DL considered it wrong but maybe they will fix it later.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/gmalcolm77

    For is how I have said it in English for seventy years.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Gez70

    Still marked wrong


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Sadhuseva

    a la escuela ... to the school


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/sguthrie1

    Not really. "Escuela" is one of those "location nouns" that need the definite article when going to them.

    Others include: carcel, prision, cama, hospital, casa,

    clase, iglesia, colegio, universidad, trabajo.

    Also, cena, comida, and meal names need the "definite article, even though they aren't locations.

    http://aprendeinglessila.com/2014/03/articulo-determinado-the/#


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ArjaSig

    Also me, confusing


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/TheEzieDawg

    for is how i have said it for ____ years


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Archie25

    "To" sounds wrong; I wrote "at" (which was accepted) and "for" also sounds good. I would say "arrived late for an event" (which might be school) and "arrived late at a venue (which might also be school)...can't think what "arrived late to" would be good for.... of course one "goes to school".


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/cerichisholm

    That is odd, I wrote 'at' and it was not accepted!


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RSvanKeure

    Me too: 20 Aug 2010. Another error DL needs to fix.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Hickycup

    I believe "late for school" is grammatically correct, as this is also stated in Oxford Dictionaries. I have never come across "late to school" in any writings before.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/GarethViejoLento

    I think is is more that one 'arrives AT school' and one 'comes TO school' and 'late' is an adverb describing ones coming/arriving. 'Arrives TO' is not English in my experience. One can also 'Arrive late 'FOR (the purpose of attending) school' which is why I think 'for' feels comfortable here) and (not relevant to this sentence ) one can 'BE late for school'.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/kirby832193

    I wrote "I had never arrived at the school late before" and DL says it's wrong.


    [deactivated user]

      Report it.


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/cerichisholm

      Yes, it is the difference between arriving at a destination and arriving for an activity/appointment. In English the word 'school', like 'work' functions as both. The difference does not appear clear in the Spanish sentence we were asked to translate.


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/KeriDirksen

      "for" wouldn't be correct in this situation because the statement is already saying "before" so " to school before" would make more sense than "for school before" February 26, 2018


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/GarethViejoLento

      whereas I ( old Brit ) use arrive late AT school - also not accepted


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/NinoVessel

      is it right to say "I had never arrived late at that place?


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/WhitePat

      In English, doesn't "I have never arrived at school late before" sound better than "I have never arrived to the school late before"?


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/biertopf

      It depends on the context. Here supposedly it's in a context where then later (but still in the past) something else happened (that's usually the reason to use past perfect). The whole exercise is about this tense, so it makes sense to use the same tense in the English translation.


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/edeeschwartz

      "Never before had I arrived late to school." That's how I answered but was marked as incorrect. I know it sounds more formal, but, hey, I'm well-read & well-educated, & that's how I say it.


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Juanalton

      You are absolutely right! Your answer is superior to the DL translation, at least where proper English is concerned. They should accept it as correct.


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/pleiadian53

      Somehow it sounds funny to me by saying "had arrived to." I mean arrived *to ... !?


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/GarethViejoLento

      'come to' / 'arrive at'


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/maturebiker

      Arrived at school late should be accepted


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/rchassereau

      This sentence sounds a bit strange in english, but with some context I can see how it could work as a sentence. For instance in a book you might read something like, "I was honors student, an over achiever to some, but sometimes you can't play by the rules. I had never arrived late to school before. There was just no going back now. I was in too deep."


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/poche112

      Why does it not accept 'i never had arrived...' but does accept 'i had never arrived...' seems like both should be accepted to me


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/D4vid.Star

      I had never arrived late to the school before (correct) another translation...I had never arrived late to the school before. WTF?


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/khonkhortisan

      What, instead of "a", would be used to say "I had never arrived at school late before."?


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Elizabeth729492

      It is NOT incorrect to say "I never had arrived late to school before"!


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/binker52

      What's wrong with I never had arrived late to school before?


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/tombodailey

      Well, the program is free and usually enjoyable and I'm learning all the time. But maybe if the endorsed translation gets above some threshold of thumbs down, DL would do some fiddling with the software and allow 'before' in the sentence above to follow 'never', which sounds better to me than being placed at the end of the sentence.


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RSvanKeure

      I entered "at school" and DL marked it wrong. DL should fix this error.


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/L.Watford

      at or to should be accepted as reasonable English in my opinion.


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/_M_M_.

      Duolingo accepts "I had never been late to school before," which is what I believe should be the preferred answer.

      "To be late" is the most natural English phrase, and "llegar tarde appears to be the most natural Spanish phrase. (They don't ever say "estar tarde").

      http://www.reverso.net/translationresults.aspx?lang=EN&direction=spanish-english

      https://www.spanishdict.com/translate/late


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/pamgunn

      The answer is wrong - in english we never arrive 'to' somewhere. It's always just 'arrive' on its own, or 'arrive at'


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/gjmontll

      DL's translation sounds awkward, particularly the "before" placement. I tried, some radical restructuring, "Never before had I arrived at school late." DL didn't like it.


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/bigolboone

      I had never arrived tardy to school before. Marked wrong 13 april, 2015


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/k-kayak

      DL accepted:, "I had never been late to school before". The word arrived didn't sound natural to me. Sept 2015.


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/estrellademar37

      I used tardy as well. Marked wrong Dec 29, 2015


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/A_Sydney

      "Never had I arrived late at the school before" was not accepted.


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/supermollusc

      I had put "I had never arrived late at school before" perfectly good British English but this was maked wrong "I had never arrived late to school before" is simply wrong


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/alicekpham

      I naturally say arrive "at" school, never "to" school!


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/julieX56

      I think at or for school is better, you might say ' I never got to school late'


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/tecunumanjohn

      "never before had I arrived late to school."...IMHO and I not English....before the school? is that on the main enterance, drop off circle?


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/sassysandy

      FOR SCHOOL IS MUCH MORE NATURAL THAN AT OR TO SCHOOL ALTHOUGH WE WOULD UNDERSTAND WHAT IS BEING SAID


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Alan6312

      I agree. Imagine this exchange. "I hear you were late yesterday". "Yes, the bus broke down and arrived at the school half an hour late". Then, "I had never been late for school before" would be the natural idiomatic sentence for most English speakers I think.


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/tonypress

      I never before had arrived late to school.


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DodoJarmann

      ”I had never before arrived late to school” should also be accepted, IMHO.


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/GarethViejoLento

      it sounds unnatural ( a rather 'literary' register) to my ear.... akin to the inversion 'Never once had I .. '


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/cerichisholm

      As an English speaker, it is much more common to say 'I had never arrived late before...' than to say 'I had never before arrived late...'


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DodoJarmann

      Pues, un poco el sonido de Poe con ”nevermore” ;-)


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/cerichisholm

      Solamente el cuervo dice nunca más? Ja, ja!


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/bjsquilter54

      "I never had ..." should also be acceptable.


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Heyjude71

      I agree "I never had ..." = "I had never ..." or even "Never had I ..."


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/cerichisholm

      It is clear that the people who have created this site do not include native English speakers!


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Iankellett

      Nitpicking. At school, to school. Both are lingua franca


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Heather16457

      In British/Australian English one doesn't 'arrive to school', one 'arrives at school'. This was marked wrong.


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/bobbybluehorse

      An equally correct translation would also be "I had never arrived late to school before"


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/montee2015

      Why is "arrived at school" incorrect?


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jude413

      In English, you arrive 'at' or 'for' not 'to' a place - you 'come to'


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/VanceRockwell

      didn't accept i never had arrived late to school before


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SnarlsBarky

      "I had never arrived late at school before" should be accepted. It is common English usage to use either to or at in a sentence like this one, although in my experience of scholastic tardiness, at is by far the more common of the two. Harumph.

      Reported July 26, 2018 (for whatever it's worth on a 4-year-old sentence that's been complained about repeatedly).


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rick659160

      I wrote, "I had never arrived late AT school before". That was marked wrong. Duolingo doesn't have much understanding of everyday English.


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/GraceEllis17

      I have never been late to school before didn't work


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/_M_M_.

      You needed to use "had" and not "have".


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/gigi841757

      This answer puts "antes" at the end of the question, while a similarly constructed translation required*** "antes" at the end of the sentence. I'm wondering if that requirement was wrong now? https://forum.duolingo.com/comment/662129


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LiliZohar

      I wrote the correct answer as above and it marked me wrong


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/blconner

      This was a word order choice. The complete verb phrase is present: had arrived.


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/rspreng

      had arrived = past perfect, AKA pluperfect

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