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  5. "Abimin iki çocuğu var."

"Abimin iki çocuğu var."

Translation:My older brother has two children.

April 29, 2015

25 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/juliacooper

whoa wait. What?

1) How do you get "older" out of any of this?

2) erkek kardeş: brother

abimin: my brother's....

are they synonyms? I thought this wouldn't really happen in turkish? I submitted a correct answer because I looked at the dropdown menu for "abimin", but i don't really understand.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Ektoraskan

Abi is strictly your older brother. We're weird like that…


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/S0R0USH

There's probably a cultural and historical reason, maybe the older brothers in Turkic tribes had certain birthrights.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/awilliams-atx

Other languages have this too, like Korean. You can't call your younger brother the same word as your older brother


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/colonel2link

Why is it çocuğu rather than çocuk? I didn't think numbers modified nouns?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/HakeemEvrenoglu

It happens because it is a possessive construction (the two children [iki çocuk] are possessed by the brother).

Note that the possessor (AbimIN) has genitive ending. :)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Akash_Polyglot

Whatbis genetive ending in short plz explain


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DevilInThe

Great explanation!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Goldy_Natanael

why not çocukları? I mean there are more than one child


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AlexinNotTurkey

You never use the plural suffix after numbers :)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/dumark53

Isn't it more literally "There are my (older) brother's two children"? The -n after abi threw me.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AlexinNotTurkey

It is something like that, if that made sense in English :D


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Meike31894

yes, but it's the only way in Turkish to express someone 'has' something. there is no other word for 'having (owning) something'


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Shahrazad26

Is it true that abi is used to show respect? In the soaps they don't use it to mean brother.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SedatKlc

it is used for older brother. and also it is used for older person that you know even if he isn't your brother. and you can also use amca(uncle) for the people who are approximately at same age with your father.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Shahrazad26

A Turkish teacher said that many native speakers use "abi" to mean brother even if younger, because they don't know better. What do you think?

I have heard them say "amca" in that sense. They also use it that way in my country as a local meaning.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SedatKlc

yes we can use abi for our friends too. it is used in same way with amigo. i mean it is like friend in that case


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Meike31894

maybe (of course i don't know for sure), but for me it's hard to imagine! all the Turkish people i know living in Germany use 'abi' and 'abla' after the name of (a few years) elder people / friends to address them. like ayşe abla, mustafa abi - but never for younger ones.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Fsilk

What's the term used for a younger brother?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/hadi949

Erkek kardeş


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Saulius.M

Would be nice to find such information in the tips-and-notes one day...


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PranaviAVS

Why is it Abi and not abı?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/A1fie

Turkish has two sets of "i"s. İ i and I ı. i sounds like i in bin. The one without a dot sounds like oa in cupboard.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Melekcobanoglu

Neden brother kelimesinin başına older geliyor ?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/A1fie

Abi specifically means older brother.

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