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"Enquanto você estiver aqui, eu fico."

Translation:While you are here, I will stay.

September 18, 2013

30 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/rmacheshire

"estiver" appears to be future subjunctive (not future perfect)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/preacherbob

you are very correct but I haven't found estiver in the Portuguese tables but in the Galacian


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/preacherbob

thanks, I see it in the table that you referenced, it wasn't on the one that I was using. Keep up the good work, we need a lot of help!!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/slearch

How did "eu fico" become the future "I will stay" in the translation here?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/emeyr

The simple present tense in Portuguese can express the near future.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Paulenrique

A bug, that could be "eu ficarei"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Danikalifornia

I'm finding I don't care much for the future perfect tense!!! Kkk.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/digodk

Actually, all the three of them are correct in the context.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/BurritoBro

The present tense can be used in Portuguese to express a near future. That's why you may here Portuguese people saying in English "I pick you up (later)", "I sleep over tonight" or other similar expressions which are incorrect English, but are correct in Portuguese.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ejlens

'whilst' was counted wrong. reported.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Equilibrio8

not very common in any modern English dialect I'm familiar with.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/alkajugl

Why would DL expect us to recognize a subjunctive form before introducing the subjunctive in the appropriate skill unit?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JuanDazo

Can 'enquanto' be translated as "as long as"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/emeyr

As long as => contanto que + present subjunctive

Eu fico contanto que você fique comigo.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/tkvaldez

don't get it.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/emeyr

The future subjunctive expresses doubt about whether a specific future action will take place. It is introduced by adverbial clauses beginning with se, quando, enquanto, logo que, etc.

http://www.learn-portuguese-with-rafa.com/future-subjunctive.html


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SFhere

At verbix.com, the future subj. of estar is spelled "estivar". Just a different spelling of "estiver"? Thanks in advance.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Davu

No, that's simply wrong *, which is quite disappointing in a tool that many people trust. Anyway, here's another opinion: http://www.conjuga-me.net/verbo-estar

* It turns out Verbix already know about this error (and a similar problem with the conjugation of "dar") - see the feedback page here: http://wiki.verbix.com/Verbix/Verbix2008Feedback


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/simbarashey

This is easily the hardest section I've come across thus far, maybe because the future perfect has very limited use in English. Can anyone suggest a link where more info can be found, thanks in advance.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/wheelofbart

Shouldn't it be... 'While you are there, I will stay (here)." ?

Because it would seem (in English) that both people are 'here', and 'staying' in the same place, in this case.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Paulenrique

Yes, both people are in the same place.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Equilibrio8

why is this future subjunctive, and not present? Especially confused because emeyr's example using contanto que Is present.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/barbaratorrance

while you are here I am staying --- would this sentence be correct?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/CarloGamag1

Could be translated this way: As long as you are here, I will stay?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/dneufeldt

Estiver is future perfect (conditional) while you are here is not a great translation. Very confusing

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