"No, spiacente."

Translation:No, sorry.

6 years ago

89 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/coltonmathew

I have studied abroad and traveled throughout Italy and have never heard this word used. I would use, "No, scusa" or "No, mi dispiace".

6 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/BrunoZoldan

I'm a native speaker and SPIACENTE is currently used, it's like a short answer.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JasmineEllaine

can you elaborate on this? why is everyone here saying that it's not really used?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/BrunoZoldan

Spiacente is the present participle of the verb spiacere= che dispiace (dislike, mind, be sorry)sgradito (unpleasant, unwelcome):
It's an adjective meaning feel sorry (spiacente= che prova dispiacere= mi dispiace=I'm sorry). Who says that it's no really used in Italy he don't really know all the uses of the italian language .

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Fatimahnoori

Is it more formal than "no, mi dispiace"? because I studied abroad in Italy but for a short period of time and never heard of it. What is more commonly used?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SamiaELSharkawy
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i think it's used for bad news like telling death because it's on google "afraid" to so it's maybe like "i'm afraid that .."

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Cate817034

I love this word.......S P A C I E N T E, it turns me on :)))

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Shewp

You are completely correct, they should change it. I have never heard anyone say spaciente,

6 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/_Sharon_

Second this. I've lived in Florence, traveled throughout Italy, and took 3 semesters of Italian in college.... I don't recall ever coming across this word or heard it being used locally.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/zhhlily020

I think it might be an very formal usage of "sorry". Just like it uses "arrivederci" as "goodbye", which is more formal than "ciao".

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/iamtoria

Yes, I studied abroad as well as lived with a native italian and they almost always say "mi dispiace" when they are saying I am sorry.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MarianaCMendes

Me either. I've been studding Italy since 2013 and in 2014 I had a piedmontese teacher and she never teach us "spiacente". Probably is archaic.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/stefranz1

Correct! "Mi dispiace" is more used, but it means basically the same

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/micah_evans

interesting, I'll remember that

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/VAItalygirl

that's what I said!

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/concifuriram

We never say this. Never. I would say, "No, scusa." This whole lesson uses "spiacente" in such an awkward manner.

6 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Chris123456

This thread seems quite long and generally holds the same opinion that "Spiacente" is rarely used. It would be nice if one of Duolingo's experts could comment on this in particular because the phrase is presented very early into Duolingo's sequence of learning and therefore many more people in the early stages of learning the language are going to be confused by it.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/yellowbear

Try the 'report a problem' button and choose other at the bottom where you can type in your concern that the words are being used unnaturally or incorrectly. When I was in Italy I only heard mi dispace or scusi used as other commenters have mentioned.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/forsilvia

Wataya is right: "Spiacente/Sono spiacente" is correct and used in formal situations.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Antoninus

There are regional variations in Italian, so what they say in Naples is different than what they say in Torino or Florence. This may be the reason for this unfamiliarity. Like 'Non lo faro' micca" is from around Bologna only.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/royastar

is "spiacente" commonly used in italian? i thought "mi dispiace" was better

6 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/wataya
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In informal settings, I'd prefer 'mi spiace'. 'Sono spiacente' is more formal.

6 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/strages
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I think, but please correct me if I am wrong, that dispiace is pointed at multiple people in a less formal setting. Dispiacente can then be used in front of multiple people in a more formal setting.

6 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/cynthia.fuentes

I lived in Italy for two months and they always said: scusa for a normal sorry, and dispiace for a more intense sorry. NEVER SPIACENTE.

6 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/el-gatino-2000

"mi dispiace" sounds better to me.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/forsilvia

Mi dispiace=normal/colloquial; Spiacente=formal

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/nicole.scoble

Is it perhaps because reflexive verbs are tackled later on in the course? I noticed that earlier on it also said "Il mio nome è [x]" instead of "mi chiamo [x]" which is more commonly used, and I thought perhaps it was because reflexive verbs come later.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/camilacersosimo

'Il mio nome e Camila' would be 'my name is', while 'mi chiamo Camila' would be 'I am called Camila.' I know, it sounds awkward in English... but it's the same thing in Spanish. You can either say 'mi nombre es Camila' or 'me llamo Camila.' I am a native spanish speaker and I would normally say 'me llamo Camila.' I'm pretty it's the same thing for Italian.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SimonKoch-Sultan
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Mi dispiace isn't reflexive.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/LuciaNM

I agree that this is weird usage....many years of Italian and never heard it used in normal conversation.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/LopezTania

How do you pronounce 'dispiace'

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Uomo_Siciliano

Deess-pia-che for Dispiace

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/faincut

I also never heard of: ""spiacente". Probably because I never been in a formal situation in Italy.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/tamsinclarke

and why is it 'no' and not 'non'?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/camilacersosimo

'No' as in "NO, I don't know you" 'Non' as in "She is NOT a tourist"

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/nunchucks

To say "I'm not sorry," can I say "non sono spiacente." please tell me.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/bb4272011

yes

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/bb4272011

siamo spiacenti>>>we're sorry

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/passionfruit12
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so it's not "no, I'm afraid"? We say that in English to say "I'm sorry" sometimes. It's not even idiomatic.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/longhoang2304

I have never heard any italian says that "word". they often use " no, mi dispiace" or " no, scusi/ scusa". when should i use "spiacente"? is there any difference?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/BlakeKimbl

As i understand it, you'd say "sono spiacente" when you're not really sorry but when you cannot grant a request. As in, "I'm sorry/I regret to inform you that we're all out of lobster" or "I'm sorry/I regret to inform you that we've chosen someone else for the job". Mi dispiace is an actual apology

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Majo492428

Baby I'm sorry not sorry

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/LoveMyBooks

many people are saying it means "afraid" so it must mean something like "im afraid" like we say in english, "im afraid i dont know". helpful?

5 days ago

https://www.duolingo.com/EliranAqua

i know the word mi dispiace...
no, mi dispiace

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/hayley_t

I've heard 'mi dispiace' but not 'spiacente' before

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/partida70

I never heard spiacente

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/marycamire

mi dispiace

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jemlush

Nonsense . Never heard it used in the 20 years I've been visiting Italy and neither used in the 5 years I have attended Italian Class.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Zigerions

Why is there such conflicting answers? Someone else said they use it and they are a native speaker.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Lynn-B

I would translate it as afraid...

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Josephine146378

I agree, "mi dispiace", I believe is more common

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/NancyStewa2

I agree with comments. I've never heard this. I would use "no, scusa", or "no dispiace".

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/bb4272011

spiacente means afraid in italia

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Jloravitz

Never heard this living 5 years in southern Italy. maybe it's Napolitono, but it's always been "mi dispiace"

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JenniferSt394024
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Never just say "sorry." It makes it sound like ypu don't really care.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Gabriel81287

Spiacente is Afraid, right?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/0044884400

I am an Italian student learning Italian and I've been taught for 4 years now that it is " No, mi Dispiace."

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/TrondRaymo

Why the hell are there so many ways to say "sorry" in Italy?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/millerc4

I have never heard of this word. I think it's meant to be "No, dispiace. I think spiacente means afraid.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ElakVarg
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Doesn't "spiacente" mean "unfortunately", too?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MarkDavis830439

"no, mi dispiace" is more common, IMHO

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/BaArthurNt

I have seen native Italian speakers arguing over this word on this platform. I guess it is a regional thing. What they use often in one region is not what they use often in the other. I can only say that this confuses those who are just starting to study Italian.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/GinaDeMeo1

Never heard of this.MI dispiace

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/alper64.

I have never been in Italy or spoken with an Italian but I feel that Spiacente is correct and widely used one :)))

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Patrizia361399

I have been travelling to italy for 40 years. I have long standing Italian friends and I have never come across this word for sorry.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Stylianius1

Why is this even a phrase

11 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/clare80348

What is the difference between spiacente and dispiace? Do they both mean sorry?

8 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/kelingorma

Why is a typo ok at times, and other times it is completely wrong?!?

5 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/chimostock

:)

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/rosanapurplerose

why is duolingo with some mistakes

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/xelanotlaw

because it's not perfect?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/22Susanna

please translate spiacente; I cannot find a translation. spiaggia translates as "beach", is there a relationship?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/squirtlesq1

Hi

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ElaineLivonia

I think this is a strange translation for I'm sorry. It's usually mi dispiace, I think.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Julie328013

I don,t no wat spiacente means

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Paul227672
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I hadn't even opened my mouth and it didn't like it! What's going on??

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/bb4272011

spiacente means sorry/ can also be used as "afraid". non spiacente ( I'm not sorry ) ( sono spiacente- I'm afraid

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/italian90-

no, mi dispiace

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MarkDavis830439

In Italian, when an "s" is put in front of a word, it turns the word into its negative. The verb "piacere" is "to please". By putting the "s" in front of piacere and adding the ending that makes it an adjective one can see what the derivation is for spiacente, ie. "displeased" That said, I lived in Italy for two years and never heard of the word so I don't recommend anybody bother to learn it.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JooPauloRe17

interesting

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/xiomer.era

Thanks for comments . It helps me want to look further into this.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Dusty_G
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Okay Italian you be you, and not Slavik

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/BarbaraGra417239

yes I agree

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/tariq-alzoubi

duolingo sometimes become crazy

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SnijdersIsaiah

yo momma a ❤❤❤❤❤

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/FundamentalGod

Stop the clutter! Please do not report mistakes here and read the comments below before posting. Post CommentStop the clutter! Please do not report mistakes here and read the comments below before posting. Post CommentStop the clutter! Please do not report mistakes here and read the comments below before posting. Post CommentStop the clutter! Please do not report mistakes here and read the comments below before posting. Post CommentStop the clutter! Please do not report mistakes here and read the comments below before posting. Post CommentStop the clutter! Please do not report mistakes here and read the comments below before posting. Post CommentStop the clutter! Please do not report mistakes here and read the comments below before posting. Post CommentStop the clutter! Please do not report mistakes here and read the comments below before posting. Post CommentStop the clutter! Please do not report mistakes here and read the comments below before posting. Post CommentStop the clutter! Please do not report mistakes here and read the comments below before posting. Post CommentStop the clutter! Please do not report mistakes here and read the comments below before posting. Post CommentStop the clutter! Please do not report mistakes here and read the comments below before posting. Post CommentStop the clutter! Please do not report mistakes here and read the comments below before posting. Post CommentStop the clutter! Please do not report mistakes here and read the comments below before posting. Post CommentStop the clutter! Please do not report mistakes here and read the comments below before posting. Post CommentStop the clutter! Please do not report mistakes here and read the comments below before posting. Post CommentStop the clutter! Please do not report mistakes here and read the comments below before posting. Post CommentStop the clutter! Please do not report mistakes here and read the comments below before posting. Post CommentStop the clutter! Please do not report mistakes here and read the comments below before posting. Post CommentStop the clutter! Please do not report mistakes here and read the comments below before posting. Post CommentStop the clutter! Please do not report mistakes here and read the comments below before posting. Post CommentStop the clutter! Please do not report mistakes here and read the comments below before posting. Post CommentStop the clutter! Please do not report mistakes here and read the comments below before posting. Post CommentStop the clutter! Please do not report mistakes here and read the comments below before posting. Post CommentStop the clutter! Please do not report mistakes here and read the comments below before posting. Post CommentStop the clutter! Please do not report mistakes here and read the comments below before posting. Post CommentStop the clutter! Please do not report mistakes here and read the comments below before posting. Post CommentStop the clutter! Please do not report mistakes here and read the comments below before posting. Post CommentStop the clutter! Please do not report mistakes here and read the comments below before posting. Post CommentStop the clutter! Please do not report mistakes here and read the comments below before posting. Post CommentStop the clutter! Please do not report mistakes here and read the comments below before posting. Post CommentStop the clutter! Please do not report mistakes here and read the comments below before posting. Post CommentStop the clutter! Please do not report mistakes here and read the comments below before posting. Post CommentStop the clutter! Please do not report mistakes here and read the comments below before posting. Post CommentStop the clutter! Please do not report mistakes here and read the comments below before posting. Post CommentStop the clutter! Please do not report mistakes here and read the comments below before posting. Post CommentStop the clutter! Please do not report mistakes here and read the comments below before posting. Post CommentStop the clutter! Please do not report mistakes here and read the comments below before posting. Post CommentStop the clutter! Please do not report mistakes here and read the comments below before posting. Post CommentStop the clutter! Please do not report mistakes here and read the comments below before posting. Post CommentStop the clutter! Please do not report mistakes here and read the comments below before posting. Post Comment

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JenniferSt394024
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Same to you with this unnecessarily long and repetitive comment.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/BrunoZoldan

Sorry?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Gabriel81287

Excuse me? What are you saying? TOO MUCH TO READ

2 years ago
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