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  5. "Ní bhaileoidh sé na leabhair…

" bhaileoidh na leabhair mar tuirseach."

Translation:He will not collect the books because he is tired.

May 1, 2015

11 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/bryji

Tá sé tuirseach used here, there's also ta tuirse air. Seems like both are correct. I wonder are there situations or dialects where one way is preferred?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/scilling

Both are correct and equivalent; I don’t know if there are dialectal preferences.


[deactivated user]

    "Tá tuirse orm" is what I learned in school in County Clare.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/BreandanAn

    Tá tuirse orm is what I learned in Belfast


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/NiamhRuadh

    'Tá sé tuirseach' is Béarlachas. While it is accepted, I've always been told that to say someone 'is' a feeling, as is said in English (I am sad, I am hungry), instead of the feeling being 'on' someone (Ta ocras orm, tá eagla orm) is not proper Irish and should be avoided.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/scilling

    The phrase {@style=font-family: 'Bunchlo Arsa GC', 'BunchloArsaGC', serif; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; font-size: 12pt}tá sé tuirseaċ ó ḃeiṫ i na ṡeasaṁ was given for “he is tired from standing” in the 1922 English-Irish Phrase Dictionary, which was “compiled from the works of the best writers of the living speech”.


    [deactivated user]

      Tá an ceart agat.


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Demanbm

      Táim ocrach/eaglach/ionnrach/tuirseach/brónach sound weird to my ears. There's a place for these words but for me it's not here.


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/19O492554

      Whatever about the others, "tá mé tuirseach" is common enough - there are a number of examples of it in de Bhaldraithe's 1959 English Irish Dictionary.


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/eilis65

      ya'know, I really don't like the sound of "Tá sé tuirseach". Sounds like it has been just translated literally. I prefer Tá tuirse air. And if one is in the business of teaching folks Irish, as Duo is, then I would prefer to see Duo teach people the expression Tá tuirse air.


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/19O492554

      Your personal preferences are neither here nor there.

      While it is true that in most cases where English uses a predicative adjective to describe a state or emotion that you are experience ("I am sad", he is thirsty"), Irish generally uses a noun and the preposition ar (tá brón orm, tá tart air, etc), tuirseach is an exception to that general rule, and it has a well established history of use as a predicative adjective.

      Some examples from the 1977 Foclóir Gaelge-Béarl:
      Tá an duine bocht tuirseach - "the poor fellow is tired"
      Tá sé tuirseach dá dhóigh - "he is tired of his way of life, of his situation"
      Tá mé tinn tuirseach de - "I am sick and tired of it"

      Examples from De Bhaldraithe's 1959 English-Irish Dictionary:
      "It is too late; besides, I am tired" - tá sé rómhall; thairis sin, tá mé tuirseach
      "You make me tired" - tá mé tuirseach, sáraithe, agat
      "I am weary of him" - táim liath aige, táim tuirseach de

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