"O limão tem um gosto azedo."

Translation:The lime tastes sour.

9/19/2013, 3:09:23 AM

49 Comments
This discussion is locked.


https://www.duolingo.com/noblefir4

Marked this wrong! : The lemon has an acidic taste.

Also, is limao lime or lemon? Because the translation says both!

10/5/2013, 2:10:28 AM

https://www.duolingo.com/G.P.Niers
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‘Limão’ m. = ‘Lemon’, often called ‘limão-siciliano’ or ‘limão-verdadeiro’ in Brazil.

‘Lima’ f. = ‘Lime’, often called ‘limão’ m. (!) in Brazil.

7/2/2014, 4:26:23 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/laurahale
1/5/2015, 8:43:39 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/G.P.Niers
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The first reference you cite says that a ‘lima’ is the fruit of the ‘limeira’ which is of course a circular definition, but normally ‘limeira’ means lime tree. It equates this to the Palestinian sweet lime, but that actually is just a particular variety.

The second one says that a ‘limão’ is the fruit of the ‘limoeiro’ which is again a circular definition, but it does clarify with ‘sour and acidic’ and ‘bright yellow when ripe’, which makes it clear that the lemon is meant. It gives ‘limão-amargo’ and ‘limão-azedo’ as secondary definitions. The former is rare (at least on the internet); both words yield images of both lemons and limes. At first sight this seems to support the notion that limes are often called ‘limões’ in Brazil.

Here's a Brazilian site drawing attention to the fruit known as ‘limão’ in Brazil being called lime in English and that the lemon is the ‘limão siciliano’. http://www.docelimao.com.br/site/limao/conceito/18-limao-origem-e-variedades.html

This site even calls it a Brazilian confusion: http://mundoestranho.abril.com.br/materia/quantos-tipos-de-limao-existem

Priberam on the other hand is straightforward, ‘lima’ = lime and ‘limão’ = lemon, underscoring its point with pictures.

If you look for the distinction on the web, you'll find more pages about it. But that's all I can do. I haven't lived in Brazil and who knows, maybe there are regional differences in Brazilian usage. But going by what I find on the web, my two-line summary seems to align with general usage.

Now, if dictionary editors actually cared about their jobs, the definitions would contain more pictures, binomial names and so on, but generally they don't. So all we can do is drag pages from the internet into the discussion in the hope of clarifying the meaning as used. If you find more pages that would add to this, please post them.

Another thing which is harder to deal with is that even large numbers of people can be wrong. Many people still believe that the sun goes round the earth. But that doesn't mean that the definition of ‘to go round’ needs an addendum. Maybe some of the resources we've consulted consider people who use ‘limão’ for lime to be simply mistaken? Who knows?

1/6/2015, 12:00:44 AM

https://www.duolingo.com/Danmoller
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Where I live (Rio de Janeiro - Brazil):

  • limão (green and very acidic) = lime in English
  • limão-siciliano would be the yellow "lemon" (Never heard of or seen this fruit in my life, does it exist? A yellow lemon?)
  • limão-galego (orange peel, quite acidic, fairly sweet too, nice juices, common in countryside)
  • lima (a totally different thing, a quite tasteless boring pale yellow and somewhat bitter fruit)
12/29/2015, 5:38:24 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/JuliaAnton14

Yes, the yellow lemon exists, and is the queen of everything! In America we squeeze its juice into our tea, and many people also add it to their water. Its juice is also used as a natural alternative to chemical cleaners. Its fragrance is pleasant and is added to many commercial products to make them smell nice. A lemon creme pie is a delicious dessert, and lemonade is everyone's favorite summertime drink. Visit us in America, and you will meet the yellow lemon. :-)

5/21/2016, 2:18:22 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/duofus
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Yes. It exists and it us delicious. We generally use the term "lemon yellow" just as the color "orange" called with the name of the fruit

4/22/2016, 7:11:34 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/Danmoller
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Hmmm

We use the color "verde-limão" for a tone of green that approaches Duolingo's green button.

5/21/2016, 4:59:37 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/SourireCache

They've also been associating the term "limão" with images of the yellow lemon in all the picture exercises so far. That's one other reason I was a bit thrown off. (:

4/19/2017, 3:55:19 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/asherbennaphtali

noblefir4, Brazilians use the same word for both. They call a lemon "limão" and they call a lime "limão".

1/10/2014, 6:53:14 AM

https://www.duolingo.com/asherbennaphtali

Hey, downvote away!

If you want to make a positive contribution to the discussion, and disagree with this assertion, feel free to post something.

Meanwhile:

http://wp.clicrbs.com.br/barradecereal/2013/07/20/conheca-os-beneficios-do-limao-e-seis-receitas-saudaveis/?topo=13,1,1,,,13

http://www.dietasgratis.com.br/dieta-do-limao/

3/14/2014, 8:27:12 AM

https://www.duolingo.com/Scutigera

In Portugal they say Limão for the yellow lemons which grow all over there (in several varieties), almost every backyard (quintal) has a tree. Lima is the green lime that is actually grown in Brazil for export (has a very different flavor from lemon and is way more expensive but essential for Brazilian themed drinks, especially caipirinha).

Apparently in Brazil limes are called Limão which could have been the closest thing to a lemon that the Portuguese explorers found or could make grow there (postulating here).

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lime_(fruit)
https://pt.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lima_(fruto)
https://pt.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lim%C3%A3o

So, as with many other things, it depends on where you are (or will be).

Other synonyms of lemon in Brazil: o limão-eureca, o limão-lisboa, o limão-fino, o limão-verno, o limão-villafranca, o limão-lunário, etc.

A lima = Persian lime (Citrus × latifolia), with cultivars including the Tahiti and Bearss limes. This is the single most widely produced lime globally, with Mexico being the largest producer

The term lime is derived from the Persian name لیمو Limu when the fruit was introduced into Europe during the Crusades.

The orange-fleshed "limes" popular in Central and South America are Limón mandarino (Spanish of course), or Rangpur and is a cross between a Mandarin orange and a lemon giving them the name, lemandarin and then limão-capeta, limão-cravo, limão-rosa or limão-galego in Brazil, and mandarin-lime in the United States, even though it is not a lime (but it does have a lovely sweet-sour taste great for many things, and is very pretty sliced).

.

A few little known citrus fun facts:

While the sour orange (used in marmalades now – except in Portugal which uses the quince aka marmelo fruit; from whence the word came from) originated in Asia, the Portuguese developed the Sweet Orange then redistributed it around the world which is why it is called Portakal (or similar) in places such as Turkey.

And for an Orange to be orange there has to be some cold for a period of time, otherwise you will have green oranges (as they do closer to the equator). :)

To be sold as an orange in the US the orange has to be orange so the distributors will develop the orange color after picking in various ways, usually by gassing.

3/5/2017, 3:16:07 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/Dean141023

Thanks for the "little known facts". I live in South Africa and have an orange tree and couldn't understand why my oranges at best got to a yellowish orange but not the normal orange colour. Now I know. Obrigado.

4/14/2017, 3:53:12 AM

https://www.duolingo.com/Scutigera

It is not how they look on the outside, it is how they taste on the inside. :)

I discovered this in Costa Rica. I had been avoiding the "oranges" there because they did not look ripe. Until one day, on a long tour, the only thing available for me to eat (allergies) were oranges and tomatoes (another thing that had not looked ripe to me) and both were amazingly delicious.

I hope your "oranges" are delicious too. :)

9/19/2017, 10:23:45 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/mandarachelpaulo

limao can mean lime and lemon

8/4/2014, 8:35:16 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/JovannyDaz

In Portuguese, they dont have a word for each, so just say limão verde or amarelo.

5/21/2016, 7:52:51 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/MarkParish

Yes.. I know it's confusing, but there is no distinction between the two..

2/4/2014, 7:29:50 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/Lordeggaron

Why is tem in this sentence and gosto? I thought gosto was like and tem is have

8/6/2016, 12:15:19 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/DavidRosen2

Can someone please explain to me the many uses of gosto? Thanks!

12/23/2013, 8:37:41 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/Paulenrique
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2 main uses: 1- gosto (first O like O in bold) = taste (noun). 2 - gosto (first O like O in hot) = (I) like.

12/23/2013, 9:17:07 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/dallas.fry11

Duo pronounced gosto de wrong?

9/6/2014, 1:27:12 AM

https://www.duolingo.com/TimothyJohns

obrigado. Thats bit was doing my head in.

2/19/2014, 4:11:39 AM

https://www.duolingo.com/nbascom

Why not limes are sour? That's how you would actually say it English.

3/14/2014, 2:52:37 AM

https://www.duolingo.com/G.P.Niers
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Yeah, that should have been accepted as well.

7/2/2014, 4:29:02 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/Easy2like

How would you say "Lemon has a sour taste." This was my answer to "O limão tem um gosto azedo."

9/21/2013, 4:07:24 AM

https://www.duolingo.com/ryshenpoelar

It is just the missing "The" in the beginning, I suppose?

10/25/2013, 11:36:09 AM

https://www.duolingo.com/Roev_Ghats

Is there a big difference between "azedo" and "amargo"?

12/15/2013, 11:49:11 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/Lauren.M.Q

azedo is sour, amargo is more like bitter

2/5/2014, 1:01:26 AM

https://www.duolingo.com/SlimAce

The word TASTE isn't included in the portuguese sentence.

12/24/2013, 10:36:46 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/reno300

Yes it is, the word gosto means taste.

12/26/2013, 10:12:33 AM

https://www.duolingo.com/SlimAce

I thought gosto meant LIKE

1/4/2014, 10:02:33 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/GabrielaAn442090

Gosto means both "I like" and "taste." Just like in English how "bear" can mean either the animal or "to bear arms."

1/31/2014, 9:07:24 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/Coayuco
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It is the same in Spanish. The verb "gustar" means "to like" and the noun "gusto" means "taste".

5/15/2014, 3:25:34 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/FranCis519910

I don't understand the principle behind the answer. So, "tastes" would be "gosto" same with "like" ? Is it correct if i'd say, "the lemon has a sour taste"?

9/13/2016, 3:34:58 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/christinad16

the lemon has an acidic taste was wrong?!?!

5/10/2014, 1:37:41 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/dallas.fry11

Acidic and sour are two different words. Just because they most commonly mean the same thing doesnt mean they ARE the same. Acidic could mean sour, dry, bitter, and most importantly burning taste. Look up "linguistics" in the dictionary. And then look up all the words in the definition of linguistics. And finally look up the synonyms of linguistics and you will understand what im trying to say. One synonym of acidic is sour. Four synonyms of sour include dry peppery salty and vinegary. Does that mean acidic means dry peppery salty and vinegary? Use the correct word. Not everything translates directly.

9/6/2014, 1:50:17 AM

https://www.duolingo.com/G.P.Niers
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Meh. It's an odd way of phrasing it, but I suppose it should be accepted. Just report.

7/2/2014, 4:31:26 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/Telisa7
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It must have been changed. This was my answer and duo marked it right.

1/15/2017, 4:07:24 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/dallas.fry11

Even in English... there is a difference between "the lime tastes sour" and "the lime has a sour taste" true the meaning CAN be the same, but the intention behind what is said could be different. The same is true in portuguese. "O limão tem um gosto azedo" does not translate the same as "o limão gosto azedo" i feel Duo fails in this respect.

9/6/2014, 1:35:12 AM

https://www.duolingo.com/Danmoller
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Portuguese simply doesn't have a verb matching "taste" in this case:

  • Something tastes this way = Algo tem (um) gosto assim
  • Something tastes like something = Algo tem gosto de alto.

If you want to say it's "currently" sour, not the taste you expected: "está azedo" or "está com um gosto azedo".

12/29/2015, 5:43:58 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/PriscillaG26

Is "azedo" & "amargo" sour & bitter? which is basically the same, right?

10/7/2014, 1:39:07 AM

https://www.duolingo.com/Danmoller
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Yes and no!

Coffe and beer are "amargo / bitter".
Vinegar, grapes and strawberries are "azedo / sour".

12/29/2015, 5:45:23 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/theoduncan

My answer was "the lime taste sour". the correction requires me to use the word "tastes" which is not in the English dictionary

11/20/2014, 12:52:35 AM

https://www.duolingo.com/TobyBartels
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Duolingo assumes that you already know English grammar, so it probably expects you to change "taste" to "tastes" by yourself.

12/5/2014, 3:30:15 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/junioralfr1

why not......the lemon has one taste sour????

9/15/2015, 12:12:03 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/Danmoller
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You cannot count taste to use a "number one".

12/29/2015, 5:45:48 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/Telisa7
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Where I'm from, in the United States, we will sometimes use "one" like this just for emphasis, even though it isn't necessarily countable. But I guess there are DIFFERENT sour tastes so they could actually be counted.

1/15/2017, 4:03:12 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/Evan.Cheung
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why lemon is sour not acid?

12/24/2017, 10:11:51 AM

https://www.duolingo.com/Scutigera

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Taste#Sourness

Sourness is the taste that detects acidity. The sourness of substances is rated relative to dilute hydrochloric acid, which has a sourness index of 1. By comparison, tartaric acid has a sourness index of 0.7, citric acid an index of 0.46, and carbonic acid an index of 0.06.[21][22]
...
The most common food group that contains naturally sour foods is fruit, such as lemon, grape, orange, tamarind, and sometimes melon. Wine also usually has a sour tinge to its flavor, and if not kept correctly, milk can spoil and develop a sour taste. Children in the US and UK show a greater enjoyment of sour flavors than adults,[26] and sour candy is popular in North America[27] including Cry Babies, Warheads, Lemon drops, Shock Tarts and sour versions of Skittles and Starburst. Many of these candies contain citric acid.

12/24/2017, 11:17:08 AM
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