https://www.duolingo.com/Samsta

Learn the Spanish alphabet!

  • 17
  • 16
  • 12

Found a great video/song for learning the Spanish alphabet! Watch this video and sing along a few times and you'll get it stuck in your head. :) This is very important if going to a Spanish speaking country, because if someone is trying to tell you how to spell a word, you'll need to know these. BTW: CH, LL and RR aren't considered letters anymore, but rather important sounds. That doesn't mean you can't use them in the song!

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=inyzVbmfCEA

5 years ago

12 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/eldelacarlota
  • 25
  • 12
  • 8
  • 8
  • 8
  • 4
  • 3

When you guys learn to say the "R" properly in the word "Flor" or "Rata", you can forgot the "RR"... they are the same... but pay attention to the another sound of "R", like "pera" or "naranja"...

But let's start with the beginning:

C: this letter has two sounds:

<pre>- Ca, Co, Cu: the C letter sounds like K or Q: "Casa", "Arco", "Cuero" - Ce, Ci: C sounds like S: "Hacia", "Cesto", "Cielo" </pre>

G: this letter has its details:

-Ga, Go, Gu: G sounds like the English word "Go". Try: "Gato", "Gota", "Gusano"

-Ge, Gi: G sounds as J in spanish: "Argentina", "Gitano"

<pre>When we want to make G sounds, with "e" and "i", like "Tiger" or "Begin", we use U between them: </pre>

-Gue, Gui: "Guerra", "Guiso". In these cases, the U doesn't sound

But if we want that U sounds like in "penguin"? We use the umlauts:

-Güe, Güi: "Vergüenza", "Pingüino", "Antigüedad"

L: this letter does not have complications, while they don't appear two L together:

-LL: you have to practice this sound. As a spanish speaker, I don't have any problems to pronounce it properly, but, as we do here in my country, you can say the same way you say "shower". Look:

"Llave" - you can try "shave"

"Lluvia"- you can try "shuvia"

Also, you can pronounce it the same way you say "you":

"Lluvia" - "yuvia"

The "sh" option is common here in Argentina, but if you want to be more neutral, try the "you" option. The sound of the google traductor is the most neutral... :)

Ñ: what to do with this damn letter?

I'll try to explain: the way that you carry the top of your tongue to your paladar to pronounce the N, you have to do the same for this letter, with the difference that you must stick the rest of your tongue to the paladar.

Try this out: if you do multiple times the movement of your tongue to say N without speaking, you must not hear any sound.

When you do the same traying the Ñ (I mean, up and down the tongue several times), you must hear a little snap when the tongue hits the paladar... then, if you tadd voice, VOILÁ! you have the Ñ!

Again... this is probably (and I say "probably" not to say "completely") stupid, but maybe it can help somebody. This works for me, but surely is because I already know how to pronounce this letter.

But OK then, if you ise "ni", you'll be well understood x)

<pre>"Año" = "anio" "Caña" = "cania" "Moño" = "monio" (if you don't pronounce this properly, the word changes into "mono" </pre>

BE CAREFUL: if you don't pronounce these words properly and use "N" instead of "Ñ", the words change their meaning completely, so be careful... specially with the first one :P

R: as I say above, it has two sounds:

R can sound similary like English, as "red" or "parrot", but it can also sound "softer".

For example: "Perro" is not the same as "Pero", but if you try to say this words, probably they sound the same to you.

And referring to the writing , is the same as English:

If we want the "strong sound R":

<pre> -between vowels, to get this strong sound we have to add another R, like "Perro". If we don't do that, we got "Pero", and it SOUNDS SOFTER. - with consonants: If it locates before or after a consonant, it sounds strong: "Arco", "Argentina", "Embargo", "Muerto" I short: the only way that R sounds "soft" is when it is located alone between two vowels. If we need the "strong" sound beetwern vowels, we add another R. </pre>

W: we adopted your sound. You won' t have problems with this letter (and principally because you will rarely use it)

X: The same as English. Sometimes is used like an "S", like in "Xilofón"

Z: It has his particular sound, most used in Spain, but you can use it as an "S" if you want.

Well... I hope it helps you with the sound of the letters ins Spanish. I don't know if it is the right place to post this, but I saw your issue with the ABC and I wanted to make your learnning a little bit clear.

Sorry for my English... I hope I was as clear as possible. If you have doubt with this languaje (like TILDES, for example), I'll be glad to help you!

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Samsta
  • 17
  • 16
  • 12

Thanks for the help! I think you should post this as it's own discussion so more people see it! And the way I was taught Ñ was that it's basically an (english) "NY" sound, like the word "barnyard". Another example would be "canyon" which, in Spanish, is "cañon." It's the same as yours (ni) but in english pronunciation. But of course you shouldn't go around typing "anyo" if you can't type the Ñ, "anio" would obviously be a better choice.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/eldelacarlota
  • 25
  • 12
  • 8
  • 8
  • 8
  • 4
  • 3

You missed the TILDE in the word "cañón"...

hehe I'm just kidding ;)... and you're right: "ni" is the better option when you need "Ñ". On my college career, we use programming languajes to work, and most of them sometimes don't recognize Ñ as a valid character, so when we need it, we use "ni", like "anio", as you said.

My laptop is from United States, and when I need Ñ, I must press the key next to L on my keyboard, 'cause that is its location in spanish keyboards and conigurations. With time, you get used to this x)

Again, sorry for my writting, specially the "IN"/"ON" issue. I don't remember exactly when you use one or the other :P.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Samsta
  • 17
  • 16
  • 12

Yeah woops on the cañón...

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/rtyb
  • 6
  • 5
  • 3

Here they are, for anyone interested :)

A (A) B (Be) C (Ce) D (De) E (Ee) F (Efe) G (Ge) H (Ache/Hache) I (I) J (Jota) K (Ka) L (Ele) M (Eme) N (Ene) Ñ (Eñe, there's not really a specific sound... Try "Niño", could say it like this "Ninhio.../Nigno/Nighnio" and so) O (O) P (Pe) Q (Qu/Cu/Ku) R (Erre) S (Ese/Ece/Eze) T (Te) U (U) V (Ve/Uve) W (Doble V/Doble Uve) X (Equis) Y (Ye/Lle/Ié/I Griega) Z (Zeta/Ceta/Seta) Besides, we´ve got some particular sounds, not really a huge deal, neither hard as well, just learn them :).

CH (As in CHair) SH (As in fiSH) LL (As in Yours, but softer) RR (As in RRRRRRoojooooo) GUE (As in Great) GUI (As in GUItar) GÜE (Doesn´t really exist, or at least I can´t find a proper example right now. Think of "Vergüenza", but U and E are pronounced in a single breath, syllable) GÜI (Doesn´t really exist as well. Try "Pingüino", same as above) Ü (Doesn´t exist, as well. Try "Lingüística", notice that this time, there´s a TILDE, accent over the I, so it really is kind of separate, Try it)

And all I can think of, yeah :).

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Samsta
  • 17
  • 16
  • 12

Thanks! But you forgot to mention that many, if not most people, call "y", "i griega", instead of "ye", and you forgot the letter "z", which is pronounced "zeta".

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/rtyb
  • 6
  • 5
  • 3

Yeah, i´ll add both names for it :) And yes, i indeed forgot the Z, I´ve added it now, thanks :)!

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/_pinkodoug_
  • 25
  • 11
  • 11
  • 7
  • 6

As I understand it, Ñ (eñe) is still considered a distinct letter and not just an important phonetic sound.

http://youtu.be/DSkG7L5fyyI

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/rtyb
  • 6
  • 5
  • 3

Yeh... Forgot... Lol, gonna add it.

Thanks :)!

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/turtle25.egh

wow ur very helpful

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Samsta
  • 17
  • 16
  • 12

Thanks! :)

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/OwenCWallace
  • 22
  • 11
  • 7
  • 7
  • 3
  • 2

this is definitely better than trying to use the american alphabet song with spanish letters!

5 years ago
Learn Spanish in just 5 minutes a day. For free.