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https://www.duolingo.com/W-Cephei

Is there a website to practice the ubication of the article "the"?

I know it is not used for general concepts, but it would be very helpful to practice it somewhere on the internet, I think there are many situations where general concepts and non-general concepts are hard to figure out.

Is it possible that Native English speakers at some point of their early lives had this problem?

3 years ago

14 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/MikaelMello
MikaelMello
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I struggle so much, thinking if I should or not use "the" in some sentence. In Portuguese is something kinda natural...

Another stuff I really struggle: think about these 3 ways (ignore the words, just observe the structure):

  • the television of the house
  • the house's television
  • the house television

I'm trying my best to learn when I should use each of them. Do you have an article explaining it?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/m.tastic
m.tastic
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The second option seems the most natural. Also, as a tip:

Always use 's when referring to relationships between people. For example, "My brother's son" or "His uncle's student".

Please note that there may be exceptions to this rule! Please tell me any exceptions you find.
3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/W-Cephei

I have the same struggle, you said that it is used between relationships of people, but... a house and a television are not people, this is one of the exceptions?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/m.tastic
m.tastic
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The 's can be used for other things.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/W-Cephei

But for example, is it correct say "the shirt's pocket"?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/m.tastic
m.tastic
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Yes, it is correct to say "the shirt's pocket". But if you are mentioning one pocket, "the shirt pocket" sounds better (in my opinion).

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/filipmc
filipmc
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Some other examples of acceptable usage:

  • The garage's light is out.

  • The light in the garage is out.

  • The dog's fur is a mess.

  • The shirt's lining is ripping.

  • The TV's reception isn't very good.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/W-Cephei

Can I say "the shirt's pockets"? Or in plural you can't use it?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/paradoxmo
paradoxmo
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Yes, "the shirt's pockets" is fine. The key difference between using 's and not using it is this: With 's, you are marking the second word as belonging to the first (The pockets belong to the shirt). Without 's, you are using the first word to describe the second word (What kind of pockets are they? They are shirt pockets.). This is why one cannot say "My dad sister", because there is nothing inherently dad-like about your aunt. But shirt pockets are a kind of pocket that one finds on shirts, so using "shirt" as an adjective to describe "pocket" is okay.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/filipmc
filipmc
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  • The sister of my friend is a nurse in that hospital

  • My friend's sister is a nurse in that hospital

These sound interchangeable to me. (There is no valid third option in this case.)

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/m.tastic
m.tastic
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Both are correct, but "My friend's sister" sounds more natural.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/superdaisy

I think "my friend's sister" sounds more natural. If you said "the sister of my friend," then I'd think you were trying to emphasize the relationship more than the person.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/maltu
maltu
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http://www.bbc.co.uk/learningenglish/english/course/lower-intermediate/unit-8/tab/grammar Hi, hope this link works, if not, just go to the BBC site in your own country, search for "learn English" then go to grammar, and then "articles" which will cover "a, an, and the" with lots of information and examples, and links to other resources.

3 years ago