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  5. "Lei porta le mie scarpe."

"Lei porta le mie scarpe."

Translation:She wears my shoes.

September 19, 2013

71 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Sionel

Having lived with a few different women, I conclude this sentence is impossible. "She" will have millions of her own shoes and would never dream of wearing mine. "She" may well steal my t-shirts though.

August 27, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Jae633849

When both are "she", I assure you this does happen!

February 9, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JaceyXD

Woah buddy!

September 9, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Kevin968039

A woman in size 12 4wide? I don't know what you've heard, but I don't usually date clowns. :-)

September 10, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/timmyxb

I was confused at first because I read this as "She door my shoes."

June 5, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RoelandSch1

So if I ask a woman to bring my pants in Italian she might show up wearing them instead?

September 6, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Asharadel

Looks like it, Roeland. I suggest you try it next time you have an Italian girlfriend and then get back to us with the results. ;)

October 19, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ThierryHermes26

funniest thing ever. my same problem

February 20, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AndriusG

So is this sentence ambiguous in Italian or not? "She is brining my shoes." and "She is wearing my shoes.". Because both answers are acceptable according to duolingo.

September 19, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Mediterranean

Not really ambiguous. If you wear something, you're actually bringing it (with you/on you). Think about it, it makes sense.

September 6, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/redmoonrider

But if you're bringing something you're not necessarily wearing it

July 15, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MayteStiles

In Spanish we say "Ella lleva (puesto) mi zapato", Where "Ella lleva" may mean she is taking, or carrying, or wearing my shoe. We also say "Ella lleva un vestido blanco, zapatos rosa y una chalina." This will more readily than not be interpreted as "She is wearing", but not eclusively and not necessarily. But if I were to say "Ella lleva un vestido blanco a la lavanderia" the context strongly suggests that she is taking them there, not wearing them there. If, instead, I said "Ella lleva una falda demasiado larga.", the chances are most people will assume that I mean she is wearing one such skirt. In most cases, though, there is more than one way "Ella lleva" can be interpreted.

November 10, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/D-n-Dweeb

In Spanish we say "Ella lleva (puesto) mi zapato", Where "Ella lleva" may mean she is taking, or carrying, or wearing my shoe. We also say "Ella lleva un vestido blanco, zapatos rosa y una chalina." This will more readily than not be interpreted as "She is wearing", but not eclusively and not necessarily. But if I were to say "Ella lleva un vestido blanco a la lavanderia" the context strongly suggests that she is taking them there, not wearing them there. If, instead, I said "Ella lleva una falda demasiado larga.", the chances are most people will assume that I mean she is wearing one such skirt. In most cases, though, there is more than one way "Ella lleva" can be interpreted.

November 27, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jogaman

Maybe, like in english... Bear (ie grizzly or polar) and then... Please 'bear' with me? (have some patience). I guess you would know if somebody was going to wear or bring the shoes for you...

October 15, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/lou458078

Not really because the use of bear would be determined by the context and usage (noun vs verb). Here I could not determine if the woman was wearing the shoes or bringing the shoes. If I say Porti le mie scarpe. How could the person know if I want him to bring or wear my shoes?

July 6, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/CodeVisio

Yes, it is ambiguous indeed

November 22, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SttSaurD

"She takes my shoes" is also acceptable. Even though I have confused portare with prendere

July 31, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/capetri

Seems ambiguous to me too... so I think context would be key here.

February 15, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/kirwin24

First she takes my sugar, now she's wearing my shoes! >:(

August 18, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/blossom_of_snow

I thought this is the verb "portare" that means "carry". I translated the sentence into "She carries my shoes" and it marked it as correct. I'm confused.

August 23, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Kristine1022

Porta means "wears" and, also, "door"?

September 30, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Ariaflame

The verb portare can mean carry, or bear or wear, one of its conjugations for he/she/formal you also is spelled the same as the noun for door 'porta' but it is used differently and if you pay attention you won't mix them up.

September 12, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Kristine1022

Thank you for your help and explanation.

January 24, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/coffeeybiscotti

Why does it not accept "Put On?"

October 14, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Ariaflame

Because it's not the act of putting on clothes but of wearing or bearing them.

September 12, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/yxcqwe

no idea

March 17, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Hedvig846842

How would I know from this sentence whether she wears my shoes, brings my shoes, takes my shoes, or carries my shoes?

March 27, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/josh2934

Would she brings my shoes be correct also?

December 14, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/sunchicaa

I put that "She brings my shoes" and it was correct :)

March 22, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/patriciovalenz

Ahh nice, because I was about to put that, but i chose "wears" just to be sure. In French is "prendre", that helps.

July 20, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Cangurina777

Could it also be written in Italian as follows; "Lei indossa le scarpe." She wears my shoes.

March 29, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RobertoFisherman

Yes, especially for us confused English speakers that are confused about porta also meaning " portare can mean carry, or bear or wear" and also door ....LOL

October 21, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/karenewool

I used "porta" in class and the prof said "indossa" is better.

July 6, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Larissa347484

I put wear not wears and it corrected me

May 7, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ShineTorre

Lei indossa le mie scarpe?

March 19, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Hedvig846842

How would I know from this sentence whether she wears my shoes, takes my shoes, brings my shoes or carries my shoes?

March 27, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Hedvig846842

How would I know from this sentence whether she wears my shoes, takes my shoes, brings my shoes or carries my shoes?

March 27, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Hedvig846842

How would I know from this sentence whether she wears my shoes, takes my shoes, brings my shoes or carries my shoes?

March 27, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MurrayTom

How can you distinguish between the uses of porta? She brings my shoes makes much more sense than wears, no?

April 10, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MurrayTom

I thought wears is indossa?

April 10, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/CassieCrayola

Why can this not translate to "You wear my shoes."? I thought that "Lei" translates both to she and you (formal).

February 14, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/zlarmer

Hey Cassie, "Lei" can indeed be translated as the formal you, but the use of the formal you is becoming less and less common in spoken italian. That is to say, it's most commonly used in matters of reverence. For this reason, I don't believe DuoLingo accepts "Lei" as a word for "you" unless indicated in the example sentence that you are addressing an authority figure, as this is the only time it would be appropriate.

March 25, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/KristaVoge

Would it really be polite to use "tu" with, say, a hotel receptionist, a salesperson, a waiter, etc.? I recently read a real life story about a North American who used "tu" with everybody in a Latin American country and ended up offending almost everybody (the source was an academic book on inter-cultural communication). Collins Italian phrasebook 2008 edition says "There are two forms of address in Italian: formal (Lei) and informal (tu). You should always stick to the formal until you are invited to use the informal", and also "In Italian, there are two forms for "you": Lei (singular) and "voi" (plural). "Tu", the familiar form for "you" should only be used with people you know well, or children". I know that in most European countries the trend is towards increasingly more informality, this is also true of my own country. Yet I would still use the formal form, e.g., with a waiter, and this has nothing to do with his/her being an authority figure or my showing reverence. Just him/her being a stranger and me being normally polite, i.e. not rude or patronising. Could any native speaker shed light on the situation in Italy?

August 10, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/patriciovalenz

Yes, and maybe it could be confusing for people who are beginning in Italian to deal with lei-she, lei-you (formal) everytime lei appears, at least for English native speakers.

July 20, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/eltapatio

Yes! Spanish is my native language so it's a lot easier to me.

September 29, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Scostumatu

As far as I know, porta may refer to someone bringing or using/operating an object. "How will she get here"? "oh, lei porta la macchina".

August 2, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Nina130229

She has my shoes

August 21, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/gaming_chicken

i thought porta means door?

February 29, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Bepe0

how do italians say " she wears my shoes " i.e. as a habit or sometimes, as opposed to " she is wearing my shoes " right here and now?

February 14, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Bepe0

Is there a plural of the formal "Lei" if one needs to address more than one person in the polite form?

May 17, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Ariaflame

I'm pretty sure the only plural is Voi. Voi portate le mie scarpe

May 18, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ddmic

Doesn't porta mean door?

November 7, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/-Libertalia-

Give me my shoes

January 27, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/margerita802022

portare ?? Is it to wear or to bring

December 16, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/margerita802022

ok got it bring or wear - clothes you wear you bring

December 16, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/gabby602935

No idea

December 30, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ShineTorre

Not sure that I can always trust this app.

March 19, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Esmeralda607812

I tought that 'scarpe' mean socks

April 13, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Hector290697

Since "porta" also means door, can it be used for airline gates as well?

April 20, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Gh0stwheel

A̲p̲p̲a̲r̲e̲n̲t̲l̲y̲ ̲t̲h̲e̲r̲e̲ ̲a̲r̲e̲ ̲q̲u̲i̲t̲e̲ ̲a̲ ̲f̲e̲w̲ ̲w̲o̲r̲d̲s̲ ̲i̲n̲ ̲I̲t̲a̲l̲i̲a̲n̲ ̲t̲h̲a̲t̲ ̲m̲e̲a̲n̲ ̲t̲o̲ ̲w̲e̲a̲r̲ ̲:

indossare - transitive verb, to put on \ to wear.
portare - transitive verb, to carry \ to bear \ to bring \ to wear.
vestire - transitive verb, vestire (di) "to dress (in)" (but can also be intransitive.)
mettere - transitive verb, literally to put on, so used with shoes, gloves, jumpers...
calzare - transitive verb, used with (scarpe, guanti).

My query is, are there preferred uses for each?
Some languages have a general "to Wear" which can be applied to all articles of clothing, but is considered bad style to use when there is a specific word for that.
So Shoes, Socks, Gloves, Hats, Scarfs and Jewelry may each have a unique word for wearing them depending on the language.

Would more educated Italians prefer to uses one of these for shoes another for socks and yet another for hats \ gloves or whatever?

June 6, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Lumpalish

She wears my shoes, she takes my sugar... What a theif!

August 18, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Dan878472

Take heart Italian learners--as confusing as this is in Italian and Spanish, in Hebrew there are at least 8 different verbs for "to wear"--one for shoes, one for ties and jewelry, one for hats and scarves, one for regular clothes, and one for glasses, one for socks, one for belts, one for buttons, bras and zippers...and probably some I don't know. Then there are different verbs for removing said items, but not as many. Of course it does take out the ambiguity!

September 27, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Gh0stwheel

That's only when you want to speak properly.
Most native speakers forgo most of them.
(Though, others may think them less educated for that.
Or new to the language.)

In day to day talk, you'd most often use:

  • to wear = ללבוש
  • to put = לשים

Even for items that have a specific word. For example:
You should say: לגרוב גרביים (to put on socks)
But you are more likely to hear mothers tell their child to:
שים גרביים = put on socks

Hebrew is also a word root based language.
So once you know how to say shoes or socks,
you also remember how to say "wear this".
נעל > לנעול
גרב > לגרוב
(Though, there are exceptions.)

!בהצלחה
In bocca al lupo!

September 28, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Dan878472

thanks for the insight!

September 28, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/meandmyshadow0

How can you tell if its, brings or wears or carries.

October 8, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AhmedMaaro8

Mean girl

October 30, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/I-AM-THE-LEGION

But she won't be(MEAN),when someone like her would be your girlfriend,right?

May 13, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MrsMixMusic

This is interesting, "Lei porta la porta"

May 28, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MrsMixMusic

Uh Oh, What if "She brings my shoes" how do you know the difference between brings and wears, then there's door, which is "porta" as well. yikes.

June 3, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Sonkat5355

I wrote She brings me my shoes. It was marked wrong

June 24, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Hedvig846842

A correct translation would be "she brings my shoes". There is nothing in the sentence indicating that she brings them /to you/.

June 24, 2019
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