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  5. "We swim and we eat."

"We swim and we eat."

Translation:Snámhaimid agus ithimid.

May 2, 2015

27 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MrBakon

Snámhaimid agus ithimid??


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Medeann

Would "Snámhaimid agus ithimid." also be acceptable or is there a special occasion to use the synthetic form?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/caoilfhionndubh

I just used "Snámhaimid agus ithimid" and it worked for me. :)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Teal_Bard

Should snámheann muid agus ithimid also count?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/galaxyrocker

You generally wouldn't mix the synthetic form and the analytic forms like that in native speech. They'd use one and stick with it.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SophieMadd4

What is a 'synthetic word' and an 'analytic word?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SatharnPHL

When you join the verb and the subject together in a single word (snámhaimid, ithim), you are using the synthetic form, when you keep the verb and subject separate (snámhann muid, itheann mé) you are using the analytic form.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Gwendalene

Thank you for this explanation.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LetaDesertWitch

Ahhh. I see. Thank you


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SophieMadd4

So the difference is, I SWIM and I AM SWIMMING? Thank you. That makes sense!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LenaCapaillUisce

Not really. "I am swimming"would be "Táim ag snámh" and in english it is what we call 'continuous' ( I am currently, right now, swimming - it's ongoing). It has the same meaning, sort of, but it's a different "aspect" (I swim would just mean that I swim sometimes, like the answer to the question "what do you do at the pool/on Sundays/for fun/in class?" In Irish, we have the analytical, where you say both full words: "snámhann" and "muid" (we swim). The synthetic is the same two words but kind of squished into one so that you can say it faster: "snámhaimid". The equivalent in English is saying "Aren't" instead of "are not", or "I'm" instead of "I am".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SatharnPHL

No, that's has nothing to do with synthetic and analytic forms.

snámhaim/snámhann mé = "I swim".
táim ag snámh - "I am swimming"

snámhaim is the synthetic form of snámhann mé.
snámhann mé is the analytic form of snámhaim.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Teal_Bard

Ah, that makes sense. Go raibh maith agat!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/caodhanthecelt

For people wondering, the form itheann muid rather than ithimid etc is more commonly used in the ulster dialects, we are less likely to use forms like ithimid or ithim here


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LetaDesertWitch

Go raibh maith agat. So either form is correct as long as we don't mix the forms?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LenaCapaillUisce

What's the difference between snámhaimid and snámhann muid? Is there a difference in tone?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/gerry.0

The difference is purely dialect . An unfair question.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Danu-anu

Oh, my God! I do not remember that. We eat is not ithimid? Why? Suddenly...


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/e_fein

Why not "snámhann muid agus itheann muid"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MissKerry17

Thats what I submited and it showed as correct! The lesson did not offer 'snámhaimid agus ithimid' as options at all for selection.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JulieArbo

When should we use "itheann muid" instead of "ithimid"? Or can we use them indistinctly?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SarahOSull10

They are one and the same and a personal preference which to use when.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JulieArbo

Go raibh maith agat!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Lisa245598

Shouldn't it be Snámhaimid??


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JanE.Fishe

The answer is given as 'Snamhann muid agus itheann muid' ???


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/nyorroyn

for the case of a verb like snámh, does it have a broad ending because the last vowel is a? Is mh counted as one consonant?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ODubhghaill

I did Irish as a child at school for 13 years and my answer is correct.

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