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"Tá focal nua agam."

Translation:I have a new word.

3 years ago

8 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/davidgrealy
davidgrealy
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And I not knowing no 'focal' at all!

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/moloughl
moloughl
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What is implied by this - "Tá focal nua foghlamtha agam" or "Tá focal nua cumtha agam"?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/scilling
scilling
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Both foghlamtha and cumtha are verbal adjectives — the sentences would translate as “I have a new learned word” and “I have a new coined word” respectively.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/moloughl
moloughl
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My question must have been ambiguous. The 'this' in my question was intended to refer to the sentence Tá focal nua agam, not to the two alternative meanings I supplied. I wanted to know if the sentence meant 'I have learned a new word' or 'I have coined a new word'.

I would not interpret my two sentences as you have done.
Tá focal nua foghlamtha agam = I have learned a new word (although literally it would be as you have translated it).

Other examples:
Tá sé sin déanta agam = I have done that.
Tá an béile ite agam = I have eaten the meal (but literally 'I have the eaten meal')

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/scilling
scilling
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“I have learned” and “I have coined” are both English active present perfect tenses, which would generally be translated with the Irish past tense rather than with + a verbal adjective + ag. The structure that you’d used could be a passive present perfect [“A new word was (just) learned by me”, “A new word was (just) coined by me”] if the action had only recently been completed.

Regarding the question that you’d intended and I’d missed, I’d say that “learned” would be closer to the mark.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/moloughl
moloughl
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Yes, you are right. But I recall my translation from my schooldays. Perhaps it was local to my area or it may be béarlachas. Another example is: Tá an tóin titithe as = The bottom has fallen out of it (literally 'The fallen bottom is out of it').

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Jileha
Jileha
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Wouldn't "I know a new word" be a correct / more idiomatic translation here? Unless we would be playing Scrabble...

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SatharnPHL

The Irish for "I know a new word" is Tá focal nua ar eolas agam.

Tá focal nua agam means "I have a new word". It has the same range of meanings in Irish as it does in English, including both the "understand/know" meaning, and the "possess" meaning that you might use in scrabble, or in coming up with new descriptions of people or things.

1 month ago