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"My foot hurts."

Translation:Mijn voet doet pijn.

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3 years ago

9 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/vzRTz
vzRTz
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Ik heb pijn in mijn voet -why woukd this not work

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Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/El2theK
El2theK
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Here's the thing with Duolingo from my point of view.

Yes, "Ik heb pijn in/aan mijn voet" technically means the same as "Mijn voet doet pijn". Similar to "I have got a pain in my foot" technically means the same as "My foot hurts". Because after all they both indicate that there is a pain and it is located in my foot.

The question then is, do you accept the sentence that kind of has the same meaning? Or do you not because there is a perfectly valid sentence available in Dutch that uses the same verb and subject in English?

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Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/vzRTz
vzRTz
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Having taken part in Dutch classes for beginners - indeed in Belgium, not in the Netherlands - we've studied that very expression " Ik heb pijn in mijn X ". It's not about Duolingo "accepting" certain answers, in my opinion, it's about a system that has faults and it's a bit frustrating when you're trying not to lose hearts (I was using the app) - on a correct input. I was trying also to notify the expression I used and maybe someone would integrate it in the correct answers.

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Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/El2theK
El2theK
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It's also a valid sentence in the Netherlands so that is not the problem. The system is: you have a a sentence and then moderators have to include all the sentences that are correct translations of that sentence. Is the sentence not included either rightfully or wrongfully it won't be accepted and people will lose a heart, which I know can be frustrating especially when the essence of your sentence is the same. The problem that occurs is how lenient do you allow the sentences to be. Do you allow a translation that in essence means the same or not and if you do where do you set the limit. For example:

"Tomorrow morning he gets up at eight."

Do you then also accept words as morgenvroeg for tomorrow morning, even though the morgenvroeg specifies that it will be early in the morning? And do you stick to the word order "Morgenochtend staat hij om acht uur op"? Or do you also allow "Hij staat morgen om acht uur 's ochtends op" and "Morgen staat hij om acht uur 's ochtends op"? Even though there is a noticeable difference between the sentences similar to "Tomorrow morning he gets up at eight" / "He gets up at eight o'clock tomorrow morning" / "Tomorrow he gets up at eight o'clock in the morning"?

Now the following is probably a bit silly with this sentence but "getting up" can be interpreted as getting out of bed. So then do you accept "Morgenochtend komt hij om acht uur zijn bed uit"?

The system isn't perfect and I agree can be fairly arbitrary from time to time. I suppose that is the same with a teacher, though a teacher will be able to say to you directly why he/she does not think something is correct, plus you don't have to be afraid of losing any hearts.

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Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/bemk92
bemk92
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This is kind of the reason why you should find someone with a good enough ability in the target language, so that you can learn the language through them.

Duolingo is a great tool, but like any tool, it's got its limits.

Computers aren't all that great at interpreting human language, let alone, multiple or judging the correctness of a human phrase.

There are developments ongoing in the building of an AI that is able to parse and build phrases in human language, and give sensible responses, but for now, nothing beats another human being.

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Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/bemk92
bemk92
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@gymnastical:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Natural_language_processing (the bit on computers understanding human language, and possibly even accurately judging the correctness of usage in a natural language).

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Artificial_intelligence. I wasn't talking A1 but AI (Artificial Intelligence). An AI is a computer system that can adapt itself dynamically to a set of problems.

The holy grail in computer is to build an AI that is capable of doing all the things a human could do, though we're years, probably a couple of decades, maybe even more, away from that.

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3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/rootale
rootale
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I disagree. While yes, the sentiment/expression is the same, they are not the same sentences. They do not mean exactly the same thing. Off the top of my head as an example - if you are trying on new shoes, and they are too tight and hurt, you are more likely to say 'my feet hurt' which gives indication to the present, rather than 'I have a pain in my foot' which could hint at a pre-existing issue. This is of course a minute difference and could be argued even amongst native English speakers but the point still stands - they are not the same sentences, they just broadly mean the same thing. Your input was not correct.

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Reply2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/getyourfree3

This is the way it is commonly used in belgium

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Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DrSkaro

Mijn voet heft pijn is incorrect?

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Reply1 year ago