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  5. "Yağmur mu yağıyor yoksa kar …

"Yağmur mu yağıyor yoksa kar mı?"

Translation:Is it raining or snowing?

May 4, 2015

38 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Ahnaqsh

Can this be rephrased as:

Yağmur mu yoksa kar mı yağıyor?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/tbs_

is there a difference in meaning


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/lucaturilli

No, there isn't any.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/EdvntL

Could you also drop yoksa?: Yağmur mu kar mı yağıyor?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/aslee1

Can someone explain the structure of this question to me, lütfen. I know yoksa is like a negative or and _ mi, __ mi is a this or that question structure, but I don't understand why the verb (yağıyor) is placed where it is.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Ektoraskan

It's short for: "Yağmur mu yağıyor, (yoksa) kar mı yağıyor?"

You can leave out the second verb.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/juliacooper

Why is mu/mi placed in the middle of the phrases? I would think it would be placed like this, "yagmur yagiyor mu yoksa kar yagiyor mi". I would be wrong, but why? :(


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Ektoraskan

Because you know that it's either raining or snowing. You're not asking if "yağmak" is happening or not. You know for a fact that something is falling from the sky, but which is it? Is it Rain or is it Snow? That's why you question the "yağmur" and "kar" by placing the "mi" after those words.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/juliacooper

awesome! Thanks, that makes sense!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Hephaestus1999

However, isn't the fact that “yağmak” is a verb, more of a reason to place “mi” at the end? Does this type or rather, STYLE of emphasis occur within most sentences that focus on the noun(s)?

Ex.: Is is rain(ing) or snow(ing)?

parenthasises are used in order to represent an implied message here


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/UniqueScreenname

Yes. You put the question article after the noun to emphasize that you are asking about that specific thing.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ZandraL.Le

Very clear explanation. Thank you. I had the exact same question.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Dioskurides

Can "yoksa" be replaced by "veya"? Or is there any difference in use?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Zohar847869

I'm also trying to understand the difference between these two.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/garpike

Am I to take it that yağıyor is a verb that means something like 'to precipitate'? The hints never individually translate it.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/lucaturilli

I'll give one example. If somebody says 'It is raining.' to you would imagine about water drops falling onto the ground. And that sentence would be 'Yağmur yağıyor.' in Turkish. But if the same one said 'It is raining blood(for example)'. you would imagine about drops falling but this time blood drops instead of water. And that sentence would be 'Kan yağıyor.'

In conclusion, the verb 'yağmak' is about movement and doesn't contain the matter type. If you said someone 'Yağıyor.' without a conversation before, it would be probable that said someone asks you 'Ne yağıyor?'


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ChickenRunner02

Does it mean falling? Is that a suitable translation?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/cvictoria42

I wouldn't be surprised if that was the original meaning at some time, but as it was explained to me, the modern meaning is purely referring to precipitation. You can't use it to describe, say, a book falling off a shelf.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/lucaturilli

Yes,that would be 'düşmek'.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Paul138242

I know that a fair number of languages distinguish "falling (a short distance, or from a known place)" from "falling (a long distance, or from an unknown place)". Could this be the case here?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/lucaturilli

Not in general meaning. That would be 'düşmek'. But for a sentence like 'Snow is falling.' you would translate 'fall' as 'yağmak'. But 'yağmak' is always used in that context: 'falling from above(mostly sky) in little pieces/amounts. If it is a natural phenomenon, little amount would be 'raindrops' or 'snowflakes' . But in a sentence like this:

'Üzerimize para yağıyor.'(It is raining money on us.)

little pieces would banknotes.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AlexinNotTurkey

Yep, although it is not used on it's own. If you want to say "It is precipitating" you would have to say "yağış yağıyor."


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/suanyang

It's like 下 in 下雨 if you know Chinese ("down" as a verb).


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Klajdino

When can I use "mü" instead of "mi" or "mı" and viceversa?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Ektoraskan

You look at the final vowel of the previous word. For Yağmur, it is "u".

If the last vowel is A or I, use "mı": kar mı, ışık mı

If the last vowel is E or İ, use "mi": dere mi, kil mi

If the last vowel is O or U, use "mu": yol mu, torun mu

If the last vowel is Ö or Ü, use "mü": göl mü, kül mü


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Dimitrius249747

İ wish you write a Turkish grammar book. Thanks for your clear and simple explanations.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Emperor-74

Can this be phrased as:

Yağmur mu, kar mı yağıyor? Yoksa should be optional, yes?

Thanks in advance.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/wojiaokamer

Yes, you got it! :) Correct ones:

-> Yağmur mu, kar mı yağıyor?

-> Yağmur mu yağıyor, kar mı?

-> Yağmur mu yağıyor, kar mı yağıyor?

-> Yağmur mu yoksa kar mı yağıyor?

-> Yağmur mu yağıyor yoksa kar mı?

-> Yağmur mu yağıyor yoksa kar mı yağıyor?

NOTE: Actually you can see that one verb is optional in both two ways (both with yoksa and without yoksa)

EXTRA ONES WITH A DIFFERENT WAY TO EXPLAIN THE SAME VERB

-> Yağmur mu yağmakta yoksa kar mı yağmakta?

-> Yağmur mu yağmakta, yoksa kar mı?

-> Yağmur mu yağmakta, kar mı yağmakta?

-> Yağmur mu yağmakta, kar mı?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/cargilb

Can this be interpreted literally as "is it raining or precipitating snow?"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/narkop___

why is it yoksa? kedi ve köpek yağıyor! :^)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Aerologia

Shouldn't it be "Kediler ve köpekler yağıyor"? :D


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/eaindigo

Oh Gosh my head hurts.

Where's the 'ya da' ? :/


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Quolh

yoksa has been used in the place of ya da


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/sanan22

"Yağmur yağıyor" has been translated as "raining" up to this point. but now it says "yağıyor" means "snowing"...I'm confused


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Ektoraskan

Yağmur = rain

Kar = snow

Yağmak = to fall from the sky

Yağmur yağıyor = it is raining

Kar yağıyor = it is snowing

Yağıyor all alone doesn't make sense.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/sanan22

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