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  5. "There is water under you. Do…

"There is water under you. Do you swim?"

Translation:Tá uisce fút. An snámhann tú?

May 4, 2015

11 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/centonola

Definitely on the top ten list of Irish sentences to be avoided when in an airplane.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/scilling

When in an airplane, I’d rather have water under me than water above me.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DominicCol12

Only if the plane is on the way to the Gaeltacht !!! Nice enunciation on this audio for a change !!! Why don't they have audio on the actual question page ?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/maranovum

Why isn't "Tá uisce fúibh" acceptable? Am I missing something here?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Eclectic1234

Did you also ask "Do you swim" in the plural?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/alphabeta

The statements could be directed first at a group, then at an individual.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RozieToez

Does An snámhann tú? in this case suggest "Are you able to swim?"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SatharnPHL
Mod
  • 1439

No - it just means "do you (actually) swim?".

"Can you swim?"/"Are you able to swim?" would be An bhfuil snámh agat?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ZoneDog1

yes, Falconhoof, i swim.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/TadhgMonabot

why can't this be - an bhfuil snamh tu?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SatharnPHL
Mod
  • 1439

Is snámh supposed to act as a verb or a noun in that sentence? With the pronoun after it, it looks like a verb, but then you have two verbs in your sentence, but if it's a noun, then you have two nouns, but the verb doesn't take an object, so there is no obvious way to interpret your sentence.

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