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"The duck is drinking milk."

Translation:De eend drinkt melk.

3 years ago

8 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/OlcayOransoy

What would be "rubber duck" in Dutch?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/lily643103

You can say "Rubber Eend"

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/harry_puttar

How do you know when to use "het" and when to use "de" to translate "the"

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/OlcayOransoy

You have to memorize if it's de or het for every noun. But sometimes, it follows this rule, if it can be given a gender, like a person, it is a "de" noun. But if it can't, like a book, it is a "het" noun. Keep in mind that this rule is only SOMETIMES applied, so it is best to just memorize the whole thing. :P

EDIT: For nouns that already have a gender, like "meisje", "het" is used.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jessejerome

I'd like this answered too!

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Vivien166808

I'd like to see that

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/arneman
arneman
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"The duck is drinking milk" is to be translated as "De eend is melk aan het drinken" "De eend drinkt milk" is "The duck drinks milk"

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/sheldolina
sheldolina
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Actually, the English present continuous ("the duck is drinking milk") can often be translated with the Dutch present simple ("de eend drinkt melk"). The use of tenses is different in the two languages: the Dutch present continuous ("de eend is melk aan het drinken") isn't used that much and can almost always be replaced by the present simple, while the English present continuous is very common.

3 years ago