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"Abbiamo ricevuto qualche giudizio positivo."

Translation:We have received several positive opinions.

September 19, 2013

50 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AntonyHodgson

if it's plural, why not 'guidizi' instead of 'guidizio'?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Viaggiatore

With "qualche" you always use the singular.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/russodo

Or why not: We have received some positive feedback.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/EstelleTweedie

I agree - "feedback" would sound more natural and would avoid the singular/plural problem! I'll report it!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LynnSerafi

I did report it. "Feedback" is more idiomatically correct in English.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LlamaNation01

But see this is the problem; idioms, being idioms, don't directly translate. You should avoid idioms at all costs in translation unless it is actually word for word (or you are doing the idioms section :P)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/colbymenning

Qualche is followed only by singular nouns. and means "some" or a "little quantity" Like some drops of lemon juice. \

Alcune (f) or i (m) = pl and can stand alone. The M or F noun can follow in plural form and alcun- must agree with that noun's gender - and with what alcun- is referring to if noun absent. But the definition of qualche is any, some , few. Only several here correct.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LesterOlso

It is also noteworthy that the hints for the word qualche list a few and any but not several when several is the expected answer.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Joyfulgozo1

Same error seen by me. Isure hope this blatamt can soon be cotrected!!!!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Lng52-._

Several = diversi; qualche = some, few.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/malcolmissimo

An Italian (native) dictionary sorts this out.

There are several translations of 'several', depending mainly on the quantity. Starting with least:

(pochi/e = few); qualche = a few; alcuni/e = some, a few; parecchi/ie = "non poco", i.e. not a few; diversi/e = "parecchi o molti", i.e. can be more; vari/e = "parecchi, diversi, numerosi", i.e quite a range; numerosi/e = a lot

The main choices are in bold. If the objects are all of one type, use parecchi, otherwise diversi or vari.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MrCrab

Why not: "We got some positive opinions." ?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Ariaflame

Because got is not received? You get something on your own. You receive something someone gives to you. And when you're learning a language it is good if you can do the closest translation that makes sense.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/coledanielj

Unfortunately 'get and got' are often and frequently misused in American English and DL is correctly not reinforcing their use. As you go through the comments you will find complaints about the use of "get" and the bad example sentences.

These words have become more slang in everyday use and there are more precise words to convey meanings. We have words which can give a better explaination of how we "get" something (steal, buy, obtain).  In this case I would use the actual meaning of ricevuto (receive)  rather than "got" in order to be true to the language.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/alanvoe

It is accepted on 09/02/2019.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jacquemarie

Is there a better word for several? To me, "a few" implies less than saying "several". "Several" makes me think of more than a few, but not a whole lot. Does anyone know of a better word besides "qualche" then for the duolingo translation "we have received SEVERAL positive opinions"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/colbymenning

parecchio, pl M = parecchi

parecchia, pl F = parecchie


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Hersched

:we have received a positive judgment" was rejected, when "we have received a few positive judgment," which they say is correct, isn't good English.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MadelynWri

If you'd said "a few positive judgementS" it would be correct English. "Qualche" always takes the singular but sometimes that translates to a plural in English.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/rjjacob

I don't understand the plural translation of "giudizio positivo." Someone please explain.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Ariaflame

Qualche means 'some' or 'a few' so we use the plural in English, but in Italian nouns following qualche always take the singular form. Just one of those things.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/rjjacob

I guess I'll grab a few wink.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ppclarke5

'A few positive judgement' is not Enlgish.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/darcara

we used to receive? Is that wrong here?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Ariaflame

That would be the imperfect "Ricevevamo'


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/acocitom19

Why not "reviews?" Is that a different word?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LotSparham

DL now allows "reviews", but rejected my translation "good reviews" - I think they're being negative in insisting on positive.........


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Madopa

Why not some positive evaluation?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/maliam71

Why not 'assessments'?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/purler

Is postive guidance way off base?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/semuc

I don't see the word "opinione" in the Italian sentence.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ZDanielle

I put "had recieved" and it was wrong...I thought the -uto ending meant perfect past tense. Can anyone help explain?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Ariaflame

We had received would be "avevamo ricevuto"

Abbiamo ricevuto is 'we have received'


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MikeSlattery

And how would you say 'we have received some positive opinion' in Italian?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Tallman69

This is the second example of "some" being translated to "several" in this unit. I'm not sure I understand why. Why not parecchi/e?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/alanvoe

"some" and "several" are similar words. The former means "at least one" and the latter means "more than two, but less than many" (a subjective definition). "qualche" means "at least one" and therefore translates more accurately to "some". "several" can work, but it is less inaccurate. "parecchi/e" means "many" and would be wrong here.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Andrea376088

several = parecchi not "qualche" = alcuni = some


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/KJR3113

The male speaker pronunciation sucks


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/C0kVebf7

also in english opinion can be singular in this context


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Vasken15

"Several" and "numerous" such a huge difference :)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Joyfulgozo1

The senence is saying a few (qualque) not several. I only chose several this time so as to complete the DL selection.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MariaIramendy

There is something I don't understand here. Giudizio is singular why is translated as plural? If qualche (some) is modifying giudizio then qualche is also singular. Therefore, the translation should be singular and not plural. OPINION AND NOT OPINIONS DL PLEASE CLARIFY THIS


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LotSparham

Hi Maria, in Italian, "qualche" is (almost?) always followed by a singular noun - that's how they do it there. English, on the other hand, just about always uses the plural in this situation. Just one of those quirks between languages.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AddyMoreno

Why not "We have received a few good opinions"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Miriam298384

same as previous comment


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/EnricBort

aren't Positive and Good the same? i really don't understand!!!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Ariaflame

You can get a 'positive' result from a test without it being a good thing.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/BampaOwl

For instance, a test for an infectious disease!

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