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  5. "Provano il riso."

"Provano il riso."

Translation:They try the rice.

September 20, 2013

25 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/danniyelle

Do you think "They taste the rice" would be acceptable ??


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/khayanlm

from having lived in Italy for 9 months I can tell you that, at least in Bologna, Assaggiare is "try" when it comes to food and Probare is "try" for everything else.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/lcf02139

You mean "provare"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Germanlehrerlsu

khayanim: Bologna? I studied there for a month 3 yrs ago & absolutely loved the city and its people. Studied at a small school called Arca in the Vicolo Posterla, really wonderful.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/khayanlm

I was with johns hopkins on belmeloro 11 a bit northeast of you. I agree it was a great time.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Sylvia754597

Grazie. Ti da un lingot.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/dwsleigh

I wrote "They are trying he rice" and the answer was "They try the rice". I suggest that each answer is as valid as the other, I am disappointed that no-one has responded appropriately to my previous concern about this same issue.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ziadat

"they are trying the rice" -- stanno provando il riso

"they try the rice" -- provano il riso

two different tenses, Present continuous & Present simple


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Bazza9

However, the English present continuous/progressive is often translated to/from the Italian simple present so without context, I think "They are trying the rice" should be accepted as a valid answer here.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/tomfy

And in many other cases, duolingo accepts English pres. progressive as translation of Italian simple present.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Wille809078

Yes, i support your concern. In all languages... This distiction is an English one


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Caterinabella

They ARE TRYING the rice is correct also. It is the present tense after all. Why mark it wrong?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jess28423

Assaggiare would be a better verb to use


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/John955060

"They are trying the rice" is a much more natural and typical English translation. "Are trying" is also an accepted form of the present tense and should be accepted here.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/lcf02139

Could this be interpreted as, They try to laugh?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Germanlehrerlsu

lcf- no, 'to laugh' is an infinitive and would require a verb. Here "il riso" is a noun.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/CarolineJanaitis

Could 'They sample the rice.' also be a valid translation?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MinorProphet1

I would say that strays too far from what they're looking for, even if in many cases it would be more or less accurate. Besides, if I were to sample, I would expect to eat from someone else's food, I wouldn't be sampling my own food. That might just be the British use/my local use of the word sample.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/YvonneStan2

that is what i put why is it wrong


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Magda399185

Khayanlm is right it "try" in case of food should be translated " assaggiare"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RobertWill713455

"riso" is being pronounced as "briso" with an initial "b" sound


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Sylvia754597

Can I say in answer to that: Che ne pensano. Cegli piacciono? Or is this incorrect?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jaime276787

She sounds trovano. I listened several times before writting and it is trovano. Please speak clearer

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